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Archive for June 8th, 2014

Set up KeePass Auto-Type on Linux

June 8th, 2014 1 comment

If you’ve used KeePass on Windows you may be very attached to its auto-type feature, where with a single key-combo press the application with magically type your user name and password into the website or application you’re trying to use. This is super handy and something that is sadly missing by default on Linux. Thankfully its also very easy to make work on Linux.

1. Start by installing the xdotool package

On Debian/Ubuntu/etc simply run:

sudo apt-get install xdotool

2. Next find out where the keepass2 executable is installed on your system

The easiest way to do this is to run:

which keepass2

On my system this returns /usr/bin/keepass2. This file is actually not the program itself but a script that bootstraps the program. So to find out where the real executable run:

cat /usr/bin/keepass2

On my system this returns

#!/bin/sh
exec /usr/bin/cli /usr/lib/keepass2/KeePass.exe "$@"

So the program itself is actually located at /usr/lib/keepass2/KeePass.exe.

3. Create a custom keyboard shortcut

linuxmintkeyboardshortcut

The process for this will differ depending on which distribution you’re running but it’s usually under the Keyboard settings. For the command enter the following:

mono /usr/lib/keepass2/KeePass.exe --auto-type

Now whenever you key in your shortcut keyboard combo it will tell KeePass to auto-type your configured username/password/whatever you setup in KeePass. The only catch is that you must first open KeePass and unlock your database.




I am currently running a variety of distributions, primarily Linux Mint 17.
Previously I was running KDE 4.3.3 on top of Fedora 11 (for the first experiment) and KDE 4.6.5 on top of Gentoo (for the second experiment).
Check out my profile for more information.
Categories: Linux, Tyler B Tags:

Force Thunderbird/Enigmail to use a specific signing (hash) algorithm

June 8th, 2014 No comments

If you’ve had issues trying to get Thunderbird to send your PGP signed e-mail using anything other than SHA-1 there is a quick and easy fix that will let you pick whichever hash you prefer.

1) Open up Thunderbird’s preferences

2) On the Advanced Tab, under General click Config Editor

3) In the about:config window search for “extensions.enigmail.mimeHashAlgorithm” without quotes. Double click on this and enter a value. The value will determine which hash algorithm is used for signing.

The values are as follows:

0: Automatic selection, let GnuPG choose (note that while this may be the default it may also be the one that doesn’t work depending on your configuration).
1: SHA-1
2: RIPEMD-160
3: SHA-256
4: SHA-384
5: SHA-512
6: SHA-224

This post originally appeared on my personal website here.




I am currently running a variety of distributions, primarily Linux Mint 17.
Previously I was running KDE 4.3.3 on top of Fedora 11 (for the first experiment) and KDE 4.6.5 on top of Gentoo (for the second experiment).
Check out my profile for more information.