Archive

Author Archive

Happy New Year!

December 31st, 2016 No comments

Yeah I know technically this is going up a day early but so what? ūüėõ

From all of us at The Linux Experiment we want to wish you all the best in 2017!

 

Categories: Tyler B Tags:

Fixing Areca Backup on Ubuntu 16.04 (and related distributions)

December 30th, 2016 No comments

Seems like I’m at it again, this time fixing Areca Backup on Ubuntu 16.04 (actually Linux Mint 18.1 in my case). For some reason when I download the current version (Areca 7.5 for Linux/GTK) and try and run the areca.sh script I get the following error:

tyler@computer $ ./areca.sh
ls: cannot access ‘/usr/java’: No such file or directory
No valid JRE found in /usr/java.

This is especially odd because I quite clearly do have Java installed:

tyler@computer $ java -version
openjdk version “1.8.0_111”
OpenJDK Runtime Environment (build 1.8.0_111-8u111-b14-2ubuntu0.16.04.2-b14)
OpenJDK 64-Bit Server VM (build 25.111-b14, mixed mode)

Now granted this may be an issue exclusive to OpenJDK, or just this version of OpenJDK, but I’m hardly going to install Sun Java just to make this program work.

After some digging I¬†narrowed it down to the¬†look_for_java()¬†function inside of the areca_run.sh script located in the Areca /bin/ directory. Now I’m quite sure there is a far more elegant solution than this but I simply commented out the vast majority of this function and hard coded the directory of my system’s Java binary. Here is how you can do the same.

First locate where your Java is installed by running the which command:

tyler@computer $ which java
/usr/bin/java

As you can see from the output above my java executable exists in my /usr/bin/ directory.

Next open up areca_run.sh inside of the Areca /bin/ directory and modify the look_for_java() function. In here you’ll want to set the variable JAVA_PROGRAM_DIR to your directory above (i.e. in my case it would be /usr/bin/) and then return 0 indicating no error. You can either simply delete the rest or just comment out the remaining function script by placing a # character at the start of each line.

#Method to locate matching JREs
look_for_java() {
JAVA_PROGRAM_DIR=”/usr/bin/”
return 0
# IFS=$’\n’
# potential_java_dirs=(`ls -1 “$JAVADIR” | sort | tac`)
# IFS=
# for D in “${potential_java_dirs[@]}”; do
#¬† ¬† if [[ -d “$JAVADIR/$D” && -x “$JAVADIR/$D/bin/java” ]]; then
#¬† ¬†¬† ¬† JAVA_PROGRAM_DIR=”$JAVADIR/$D/bin/”
#¬† ¬†¬† ¬† echo “JRE found in ${JAVA_PROGRAM_DIR} directory.”
#       if check_version ; then
#          return 0
#       else
#          return 1
#       fi
#    fi
# done
# echo “No valid JRE found in ${JAVADIR}.”
# return 1
}

Once you’ve saved the file you should be able to run the normal areca.sh script now without encountering any errors!


This post originally appeared on my personal website here.

vi(m) or emacs? Neither, just use nano!

December 29th, 2016 No comments

There is quite a funny, almost religious, debate within the Linux community between the two venerable command line text editors vi or Vim and Emacs. Sure they have loads of features and plugins but do you really need that from a command line editor? I think for the most part, or perhaps for most people at least, the answer is no. Instead I’m going to do something really stupid and publicly state, on a Linux related website, that you should ignore both of those text editors and instead use what many consider an inferior, more simplistic one instead: nano.

Sure it doesn’t have all of the fancy bells and whistles but honestly half the time I’m using a command line editor it’s just to change one line of text. I don’t generally need the extra fluff and when I do I can always use a graphical editor instead. Besides it’s so easy to use… just look at how easy it is to use:

Create/edit a file:

  1. Open the file in nano
  2. Make your changes
  3. Save the changes

Open the file:

nano doc.txt

Make your changes:

Admit it, it's true!

Admit it, it’s true!

 

Save your changes:

No complicated key combinations to remember – it’s all listed at the bottom of the screen. Want to save, “Write Out,” your changes? Easy as Ctrl+O and then Enter to confirm.

Sooooooooo easy to use

Sooooooooo easy to use

So let’s all come together, stop the fanboy wars, and all embrace nano as the best command line text editor out there! ūüėõ

 

Categories: Linux, Open Source Software, Tyler B Tags: , , ,

Going Linux Podcast (Still Going)

December 28th, 2016 No comments

Way back in the early¬†days of The Linux Experiment I came across an excellent podcast called Going Linux which offered beginners advice for those people trying out Linux for the first time or just wanting to know more about Linux in general. I so happy to see that the podcast is still going strong (now at over 300 episodes!) and wanted to mention them again here because they were very helpful in our original experiment’s goal of Going Linux.

Their mascot might actually be better than ours!

Please do check them out at http://goinglinux.com/ or subscribe to their podcast by following the steps here.

 

Categories: Podcast, Tyler B Tags: ,

Help out a project with OpenHatch

December 27th, 2016 No comments

OpenHatch is a site that aggregates all of the help postings from a variety of open source projects. It maintains a whole community dedicated to matching people who want to contribute with people who need their help. You don’t even need to be technical like a programmer or something like that. Instead if you want to lend your artistic talents to creating icons and logos for a project, or your writing skills to help them out with documentation – both areas a lot of open source projects aren’t the best with – I’m sure they would be greatly appreciative.

So what are you waiting for? Get connected and give back to the community that helps create the applications you use on a daily basis!

Blast from the Past: Automatically put computer to sleep and wake it up on a schedule

December 26th, 2016 No comments

This post was originally published on June 24, 2012. The original can be found here.


Ever wanted your computer to be on when you need it but automatically put itself to sleep (suspended) when you don’t? Or maybe you just wanted to create a really elaborate alarm clock?

I stumbled across this very useful command a while back but only recently created a script that I now run to control when my computer is suspended and when it is awake.

#!/bin/sh
t=`date –date “17:00” +%s`
sudo /bin/true
sudo rtcwake -u -t $t -m on &
sleep 2
sudo pm-suspend

This creates a variable, t above, with an assigned time and then runs the command rtcwake to tell the computer to automatically wake itself up at that time. In the above example I’m telling the computer that it should wake itself up automatically at 17:00 (5pm). It then sleeps for 2 seconds (just to let the rtcwake command finish what it is doing) and runs pm-suspend which actually puts the computer to sleep. When run the computer will put itself right to sleep and then wake up at whatever time you specify.

For the final piece of the puzzle, I’ve scheduled this script to run daily (when I want the PC to actually go to sleep) and the rest is taken care of for me. As an example, say you use your PC from 5pm to midnight but the rest of the time you are sleeping or at work. Simply schedule the above script to run at midnight and when you get home from work it will be already up and running and waiting for you.

I should note that your computer must have compatible hardware to make advanced power management features like suspend and wake work so, as with everything, your mileage may vary.

This post originally appeared on my personal website here.

 

5 apt tips and tricks

December 22nd, 2016 No comments

Everyone loves apt. It’s a simple command line tool to install new programs and update your system, but beyond the standard commands like update, install and upgrade did you know there are a load of other useful apt-based commands you can run?

1) Search for a package name with apt-cache search

Can’t remember the exact package name but you know some of it? Make it easy on yourself and search using apt-cache. For example:

apt-cache search Firefox

It lists all results for your search. Nice and easy!

It lists all results for your search. Nice and easy!

2) Search for package information with apt-cache show

Want details of a package before you install it? Simple just search for it with apt-cache show.

apt-cache show firefox

More details than you probably even wanted!

More details than you probably even wanted!

3) Upgrade only a specific package

So you already know that you can upgrade your whole system by running

apt-get upgrade

but did you know you can upgrade a specific package instead of the whole system? It’s easy, just specify the package name in the upgrade command. For example to upgrade just firefox run:

apt-get upgrade firefox

4) Install specific package version

Normally when you apt-get install something you get the latest version available but what if that’s not what you wanted? What if you wanted a specific version of the package instead? Again, simple, just specify it when you run the install command. For example run:

apt-get install firefox=version

Where version is the version number you wish to install.

5) Free up disk space with clean

When you download and install packages apt will automatically cache them on your hard drive. This can be useful for a number of reasons, for example some distributions use delta packages so that only what has changed between versions are re-downloaded. In order to do this it needs to have a base cached file already on your hard drive. However these files can take up a lot of space and often times don’t get a lot of updates anyway. Thankfully there are two quick commands that free up this disk space.

apt-get clean

apt-get autoclean

Both of these essentially do the same thing but the difference here is autoclean only gets rid of cached files that have a newer version also cached on your hard drive. These older packages won’t be used anymore and so they are an easy way to free up some space.

There you have it, you are now officially 5 apt commands smarter. Happy computing!

 

Discover and listen to your next favourite band, all free!

December 20th, 2016 No comments

Jamendo is a wonderful website where artists can share their music and fans can listen all for free. The music featured is all released under various Creative Commons licenses and so it is free to use and listen to, burn it onto a CD (if people still do that?), put it on your music device and take it on the go, or cut it up and use it in your own works like a podcast. In cases where there may otherwise be a license conflict, for example if you are advertising in your podcast or not releasing it under the same license as the music, Jamendo even facilitates buying a commercial license for yours needs. Sure these features make it attractive for content creators looking for some free background music but none of this is where Jamendo really shines. It shines in just how good of an experience it is to find and listen to new music.

A simple interface makes finding new music a joy

A simple interface makes finding new music a joy

From fostering different music communities, putting together nice playlists or featuring new music Jamendo always has something new to discover.

A few quick stats about Jamendo taken straight from their website:

  • A wide catalog of more than 500,000 tracks
  • More than 40,000 artists
  • Over 150 countries

You can find Jamendo’s website at https://www.jamendo.com.

 

Categories: Tyler B Tags: , , ,

CoreGTK 3.18.0 Released!

December 18th, 2016 No comments

The next version of CoreGTK, version 3.18.0, has been tagged for release! This is the first version of CoreGTK to support GTK+ 3.18.

Highlights for this release:

  • Rebased on GTK+ 3.18
  • New supported GtkWidgets in this release:
    • GtkActionBar
    • GtkFlowBox
    • GtkFlowBoxChild
    • GtkGLArea
    • GtkModelButton
    • GtkPopover
    • GtkPopoverMenu
    • GtkStackSidebar
  • Reverted to using GCC as the default compiler (but clang can still be used)

CoreGTK is an Objective-C language binding for the GTK+ widget toolkit. Like other “core” Objective-C libraries, CoreGTK is designed to be a thin wrapper. CoreGTK is free software, licensed under the GNU LGPL.

Read more about this release here.

This post originally appeared on my personal website here.

Blast from the Past: An Experiment in Transitioning to Open Document Formats

December 16th, 2016 No comments

This post was originally published on June 15, 2013. The original can be found here.


Recently I read an interesting article by Vint Cerf, mostly known as the man behind the TCP/IP protocol that underpins modern Internet communication, where he brought up a very scary problem with everything going digital. I’ll quote from the article (Cerf sees a problem: Today’s digital data could be gone tomorrow – posted June 4, 2013) to explain:

One of the computer scientists who turned on the Internet in 1983, Vinton Cerf, is concerned that much of the data created since then, and for years still to come, will be lost to time.

Cerf warned that digital things created today — spreadsheets, documents, presentations as well as mountains of scientific data — won’t be readable in the years and centuries ahead.

Cerf illustrated the problem in a simple way. He runs Microsoft Office 2011 on Macintosh, but it cannot read a 1997 PowerPoint file. “It doesn’t know what it is,” he said.

“I’m not blaming Microsoft,” said Cerf, who is Google’s vice president and chief Internet evangelist. “What I’m saying is that backward compatibility is very hard to preserve over very long periods of time.”

The data objects are only meaningful if the application software is available to interpret them, Cerf said. “We won’t lose the disk, but we may lose the ability to understand the disk.”

This is a well known problem for anyone who has used a computer for quite some time. Occasionally you’ll get sent a file that you simply can’t open because the modern application you now run has ‘lost’ the ability to read the format created by the (now) ‘ancient’ application. But beyond this minor inconvenience it also brings up the question of how future generations, specifically historians, will be able to look back on our time and make any sense of it. We’ve benefited greatly in the past by having mediums that allow us a more or less easy interpretation of written text and art. Newspaper clippings, personal diaries, heck even cave drawings are all relatively easy to translate and interpret when compared to unknown, seemingly random, digital content. That isn’t to say it is an impossible task, it is however one that has (perceivably) little market value (relatively speaking at least) and thus would likely be de-emphasized or underfunded.

A Solution?

So what can we do to avoid these long-term problems? Realistically probably nothing. I hate to sound so down about it but at some point all technology will yet again make its next leap forward and likely render our current formats completely obsolete (again) in the process. The only thing we can do today that will likely have a meaningful impact that far into the future is to make use of very well documented and open standards. That means transitioning away from so-called binary formats, like .doc and .xls, and embracing the newer open standards meant to replace them. By doing so we can ensure large scale compliance (today) and work toward a sort of saturation effect wherein the likelihood of a complete ‘loss’ of ability to interpret our current formats decreases. This solution isn’t just a nice pie in the sky pipe dream for hippies either. Many large multinational organizations, governments, scientific and statistical groups and individuals are also all beginning to recognize this same issue and many have begun to take action to counteract it.

Enter OpenDocument/Office Open XML

Back in 2005 the Organization for the Advancement of Structured Information Standards (OASIS) created a technical committee to help develop a completely transparent and open standardized document format the end result of which would be the OpenDocument standard. This standard has gone on to be the default file format in most open source applications (such as LibreOffice, OpenOffice.org, Calligra Suite, etc.) and has seen wide spread adoption by many groups and applications (like Microsoft Office). According to Wikipedia the OpenDocument is supported and promoted by over 600 companies and organizations (including Apple, Adobe, Google, IBM, Intel, Microsoft, Novell, Red Hat, Oracle, Wikimedia Foundation, etc.) and is currently the mandatory standard for all NATO members. It is also the default format (or at least a supported format) by more than 25 different countries and many more regions and cities.

Not to be outdone, and potentially lose their position as the dominant office document format creator, Microsoft introduced a somewhat competing format called Office Open XML in 2006. There is much in common between these two formats, both being based on XML and structured as a collection of files within a ZIP container. However they do differ enough that they are 1) not interoperable and 2) that software written to import/export one format cannot be easily made to support the other. While OOXML too is an open standard there have been some concerns about just how open it actually is. For instance take these (completely biased) comparisons done by the OpenDocument Fellowship: Part I / Part II. Wikipedia (Open Office XML – from June 9, 2013) elaborates in saying:

Starting with Microsoft Office 2007, the Office Open XML file formats have become the default file format of Microsoft Office. However, due to the changes introduced in the Office Open XML standard, Office 2007 is not entirely in compliance with ISO/IEC 29500:2008. Microsoft Office 2010 includes support for the ISO/IEC 29500:2008 compliant version of Office Open XML, but it can only save documents conforming to the transitional schemas of the specification, not the strict schemas.

It is important to note that OpenDocument is not without its own set of issues, however its (continuing) standardization process is far more transparent. In practice I will say that (at least as of the time of writing this article) only Microsoft Office 2007 and 2010 can consistently edit and display OOXML documents without issue, whereas most other applications (like LibreOffice and OpenOffice) have a much better time handling OpenDocument. The flip side of which is while Microsoft Office can open and save to OpenDocument format it constantly lags behind the official standard in feature compliance. Without sounding too conspiratorial this is likely due to Microsoft wishing to show how much ‘better’ its standard is in comparison. That said with the forthcoming 2013 version Microsoft is set to drastically improve its compatibility with OpenDocument so the overall situation should get better with time.

Current day however I think, technologically, both standards are now on more or less equal footing. Initially both standards had issues and were lacking some features however both have since evolved to cover 99% of what’s needed in a document format.

What to do?

As discussed above there are two different, some would argue, competing open standards for the replacement of the old closed formats. Ten years ago I would have said that the choice between the two is simple: Office Open XML all the way. However the landscape of computing has changed drastically in the last decade and will likely continue to diversify in the coming one. Cell phone sales have superseded computers and while Microsoft Windows is still the market leader on PCs, alternative operating systems like Apple’s Mac OS X and Linux have been gaining ground. Then you have the new cloud computing contenders like Google’s Google Docs which let you view and edit documents right within a web browser making the operating system irrelevant. All of this heterogeneity has thrown a curve ball into how standards are established and being completely interoperable is now key – you can’t just be the market leader on PCs and expect everyone else to follow your lead anymore. I don’t want to be limited in where I can use my documents, I want them to work on my PC (running Windows 7), my laptop (running Ubuntu 12.04), my cellphone (running iOS 5) and my tablet (running Android 4.2). It is because of these reasons that for me the conclusion, in an ideal world, is OpenDocument. For others the choice may very well be Office Open XML and that’s fine too – both attempt to solve the same problem and a little market competition may end up being beneficial in the short term.

Is it possible to transition to OpenDocument?

This is the tricky part of the conversation. Lets say you want to jump 100% over to OpenDocument… how do you do so? Converting between the different formats, like the old .doc or even the newer Office Open XML .docx, and OpenDocument’s .odt is far from problem free. For most things the conversion process should be as simple as opening the current format document and re-saving it as OpenDocument – there are even wizards that will automate this process for you on a large number of documents. In my experience however things are almost never quite as simple as that. From what I’ve seen any document that has a bulleted list ends up being converted with far from perfect accuracy. I’ve come close to re-creating the original formatting manually, making heavy use of custom styles in the process, but its still not a fun or straightforward task – perhaps in these situations continuing to use Microsoft formatting, via Office Open XML, is the best solution.

If however you are starting fresh or just converting simple documents with little formatting there is no reason why you couldn’t make the jump to OpenDocument. For me personally I’m going to attempt to convert my existing .doc documents to OpenDocument (if possible) or Office Open XML (where there are formatting issues). By the end I should be using exclusively open formats which is a good thing.

I’ll write a follow up post on my successes or any issues encountered if I think it warrants it. In the meantime I’m curious as to the success others have had with a process like this. If you have any comments or insight into how to make a transition like this go more smoothly I’d love to hear it. Leave a comment below.

This post originally appeared on my personal website here.

 

Using screen to keep your terminal sessions alive

December 15th, 2016 No comments

Have you ever connected to a remote Linux computer, using a… let’s say less than ideal WiFi connection, and started running a command only to have your ssh connection drop and your command killed off in a half finished state? In the best of cases this is simply annoying but if it happens during something of consequence, like a system upgrade, it can leave you in a dire state. Thankfully there is a really simple way to avoid this from happening.

Enter: screen

screen is a simple terminal application that basically allows you to create additional persistent terminals. So instead of ssh-ing into your computer and running the command in that session you can instead start a screen session and then run your commands within that. If your connection drops you lose your ‘screen’ but the screen session continues uninterrupted on the computer. Then you can simply re-connect and resume the screen.

Explain with an example!

OK fine. Let’s say I want to write a document over ssh. First you connect to the computer then you start your favourite text editor and begin typing:

ssh user@computer
user@computer’s password:

user@computer: nano doc.txt

What a wonderful document!

What a wonderful document!

Now if I lost my connection at this point all of my hard work would also be lost because I haven’t saved it yet. Instead let’s say I used screen:

ssh user@computer
user@computer’s password:

user@computer: screen

Welcome to screen!

Welcome to screen!

Now with screen running I can just use my terminal like normal and write my story. But oh no I lost my connection! Now what will I do? Well simply re-connect and re-run screen telling it to resume the previous session.

ssh user@computer
user@computer’s password:

user@computer: screen -r

Voila! There you have it – a simple way to somewhat protect your long-running terminal applications from random network disconnects.

 

The Linux Action Show

December 13th, 2016 No comments

This isn’t a normal post for The Linux Experiment but I wanted to give a shout out to the guys over at the Linux Action Show. The Linux Action Show is a long running weekly Jupiter Broadcasting¬†podcast that aims to bring the listeners up to speed on all things Linux news as well as cover one major topic in-depth per episode. While it’s true that sometimes the hosts can be a bit… ‘Linux-preachy’ or gloss over the (sometimes major) hurdles in choosing to run¬†open source software they always put together an entertaining and informative show.

It's a Linux podcast... what did you expect? :P

It’s a Linux podcast… what did you expect? ūüėõ

If a Linux podcast sounds like something you might be interested in I would highly recommend checking them out!

Linux Action Show @ Jupiter Broadcasting

 

Blast from the Past: Top 10 things I have learned since the start of this experiment

December 9th, 2016 No comments

This post was originally published on October 2, 2009. The original can be found here.


In a nod to Dave’s classic top ten segment I will now share with you the top 10 things I have learned since starting this experiment one month ago.

10: IRC is not dead

Who knew? I’m joking of course but I had no idea that so many people still actively participated in IRC chats. As for the characters who hang out in these channels… well some are very helpful and some… answer questions like this:

Tyler: Hey everyone. I’m looking for some help with Gnome’s Empathy IM client. I can’t seem to get it to connect to MSN.

Some asshat: Tyler, if I wanted a pidgin clone, I would just use pidgin

It’s this kind of ‘you’re doing it wrong because that’s not how I would do it’ attitude can be very damaging to new Linux users. There is nothing more frustrating than trying to get help and someone throwing BS like that back in your face.

9: Jokes about Linux for nerds can actually be funny

Stolen from Sasha’s post.

Admit it, you laughed too

Admit it, you laughed too

8. Buy hardware for your Linux install, not the other way around

Believe me, if you know that your hardware is going to be 100% compatible ahead of time you will have a much more enjoyable experience. At the start of this experiment Jon pointed out this useful website. Many similar sites also exist and you should really take advantage of them if you want the optimal Linux experience.

7. When it works, it’s unparalleled

Linux seems faster, more featured and less resource hogging than a comparable operating system from either Redmond or Cupertino. That is assuming it’s working correctly…

6. Linux seems to fail for random or trivial reasons

If you need proof of these just go take a look back on the last couple of posts on here. There are times when I really think Linux could be used by everyone… and then there are moments when I don’t see how anyone outside of the most hardcore computer users could ever even attempt it. A brand new user should not have to know about xorg.conf or how to edit their DNS resolver.

Mixer - buttons unchecked

5. Linux might actually have a better game selection than the Mac!

Obviously there was some jest in there but Linux really does have some gems for games out there. Best of all most of them are completely free! Then again some are free for a reason

Armagetron

Armagetron

4. A Linux distribution defines a lot of your user experience

This can be especially frustrating when the exact same hardware performs so differently. I know there are a number of technical reasons why this is the case but things seem so utterly inconsistent that a new Linux user paired with the wrong distribution might be easily turned off.

3. Just because its open source doesn’t mean it will support everything

Even though it should damn it! The best example I have for this happens to be MSN clients. Pidgin is by far my favourite as it seems to work well and even supports a plethora of useful plugins! However, unlike many other clients, it doesn’t support a lot of MSN features such as voice/video chat, reliable file transfers, and those god awful winks and nudges that have appeared in the most recent version of the official client. Is there really that good of a reason holding the Pidgin developers back from just making use of the other open source libraries that already support these features?

2. I love the terminal

I can’t believe I actually just said that but it’s true. On a Windows machine I would never touch the command line because it is awful. However on Linux I feel empowered by using the terminal. It lets me quickly perform tasks that might take a lot of mouse clicks through a cumbersome UI to otherwise perform.

And the #1 thing I have learned since the start of this experiment? Drum roll please…

1. Linux might actually be ready to replace Windows for me

But I guess in order to find out if that statement ends up being true you’ll have to keep following along ūüėČ

 

KWLUG: C Language, WebOS (2016-12)

December 8th, 2016 No comments

This is a podcast presentation from the Kitchener Waterloo Linux Users Group on the topic of C Language, WebOS published on December 6th 2016. You can find the original Kitchener Waterloo Linux Users Group post here.

Read more…

Categories: Linux, Podcast, Tyler B Tags: ,

Alternative software: Abiword word processor

December 8th, 2016 No comments

Continuing my ‘quest to seek out the hidden gems amongst the Linux alternative software pile’ I decided to take a look into alternative word processors this time. Outside of the major two offerings, LibreOffice and OpenOffice, there are two smaller word processors that often get mentioned: Abiword and Calligra Words. This post is about the former.

So what is Abiword anyway?

Well Abiword is, shocker!, a word processor just like LibreOffice or Microsoft Word. What makes it different from the other two is that it tends to be a bit more lean and stripped down which makes it lighter on system resources. It does this by not offering the same number of features that the bigger word processors do but there is an argument to be made that most people don’t even use half of those features anyway. Instead Abiword focuses on the core writing experience.

A much leaner interface than most 'bigger' word processors

A much leaner interface than most ‘bigger’ word processors

So what is is like to type in Abiword? Well, put simply, for the most part it is pretty boring. I suppose that is a good thing for a word processor but it also points out one of Abiword’s biggest failings: there’s no real compelling reason to use it. In fact there are a few compelling reasons not to use it including: that it’s a smaller project, and thus not likely to get as much attention or develop as much software maturity as something like LibreOffice, and that it honestly seems a bit buggy. For example when starting to type the above paragraph within the application itself I ended up with a cursor that was stuck in the middle of a letter in my word.

Forgive the spelling issues I wanted to grab a screenshot in case the bug disappeared.

Forgive the spelling/grammar issues – I wanted to grab a screenshot as quickly as possible in case the bug disappeared.

I also had an issue with Abiword integrating cleanly with my desktop environment’s theme. I’m not saying this is specifically a fault in Abiword but I can say that LibreOffice does integrate with the theme much better.

That sure is a dark ruler...

That sure is a dark ruler…

And yes, while it’s true that Abiword does take up less resources that doesn’t necessarily mean that it’s doing the same job. For example I copied the content of this post, above what I’m currently writing, and pasted it into both LibreOffice Writer and Abiword to see what the results would be. LibreOffice Writer took about 50MB to display the content while Abiword only took around 20MB but just look at the differences…

OK, that looks pretty close to the original post I copied from

OK, that looks pretty close to the original post I copied from

What happened here? Images became a bullet point list that continue through the rest of the document? And why is everything so super-sized?

What happened here? Images became a bullet point list that continues through the rest of the document? And why is everything so super-sized?

I guess my point is while I don’t think you need your word processor to be flashy you do need it to be a work horse. It, above most other software packages a user installs, is the quintessential productivity application and absolutely needs to get out of your way and work. I’m not saying LibreOffice is perfect, far from it in fact, I just don’t see a good reason to recommend someone deal with the issues in Abiword in order to save an extra couple of MB of RAM.

 

Categories: Open Source Software, Tyler B Tags:

KWLUG: OpenWRT customization (2016-11)

December 7th, 2016 No comments

This is a podcast presentation from the Kitchener Waterloo Linux Users Group on the topic of OpenWRT customization published on December 6th 2016. You can find the original Kitchener Waterloo Linux Users Group post here.

Read more…

Categories: Linux, Podcast, Tyler B Tags: ,

Enjoy some free audiobooks with LibriVox!

December 6th, 2016 No comments

LibriVox is a really neat project that takes volunteer readers who record themselves reading public domain works aloud and packages up the results as¬†completely free audiobooks. This is a great alternative to something like the commercial offerings found at Audible, although it doesn’t¬†have anywhere near the same number of available books to choose from. This is especially true if you stray away from the classics and want something a bit more… modern.

Do you have an awesome reading voice? Maybe you should contribute to the project!

Do you have an awesome reading voice? Maybe you should contribute to the project!

Even still I’ve listened to a few so far and, while some readers are¬†certainly better than others, I have to say I’m quite impressed with the overall quality of the recordings. There are also some mobile apps for iOS and Android that make the whole listening experience¬†very nice.

 

Blast from the Past: Open formats are… the best formats?

December 2nd, 2016 No comments

This post was originally published on January 17, 2016. The original can be found here.


Over the past few years there has been a big push to replace proprietary formats with open formats. For example Open Document Format and Office Open XML have largely replaced the legacy binary formats, we’re now seeing HTML5 + JavaScript supplant Silverlight and Java applets, and even the once venerable Flash is on its deathbed.

This of course all makes sense. We’re now in an era where the computing platforms, be it Microsoft Windows, Apple OS X, Android, iOS, Linux, etc., simply don’t command the individual market shares (or at least mind shares) that they once used to. Things are… more diversified now. And while they may not matter to the user the underlying differences in technologies certainly matter to the developer. This is one of the many reasons you see lots of movement to open formats where the same format can be implemented, relatively easily, on all of the aforementioned platforms.

So then the question must be asked: does this trend mean that open formats are the best formats? That is obviously quite a simple question to a deep (and perhaps subjective) subject so perhaps it’s better to look at it from a user adoption perspective. Does being an open format, given all of its advantages, translate to market adoption? There the answer is not as clear.

Open by example

Let’s take a look a few instances where a clear format winner exists and see if it is an open format or a closed/proprietary format.

Documents

When it comes to documents the Open Document Format and Open Office XML have largely taken over. This has been driven largely by Microsoft making Office Open XML the default file format in all versions of Microsoft Office since 2007. Additionally many governments and organizations around the world have standardized on the use of Open Document Format. That said older Microsoft Office binary formats (i.e. .doc, .xls, etc.) are still widely in use.

Verdict: open formats have largely won out.

Audio

For the purposes of the “audio” category let’s consider simply the audio codec that most people use to consume their music. In that regard MP3 is still the absolute dominant format. While it is somewhat encumbered by patents you will hardly find a single device out there that doesn’t support it. This is true even when there are better lossy compression formats (including the proprietary AAC or open Ogg Vorbis) as well as lossless formats like FLAC.

Verdict: the closed/proprietary MP3 format is the de facto standard.

Video

Similarly for the “video” category I’ll only be focusing on the codecs. While there are plenty of open video formats (Theora, WebM, etc.) they are not nearly as well supported as the proprietary formats like MPEG-2, H.264, etc. Additionally the open formats (in general) don’t have quite as good quality vs size ratios as the proprietary ones which is often while you’ll see websites using them in order to save on bandwidth.

Verdict: closed/proprietary formats have largely won out.

File Compression

Compression is something that most people consider more as an algorithm than a format which is why I’ll be focusing on the compressed file container formats for this category. In that regard the ZIP file format is by far the most common. It has native support in every modern operating system and offers decent compression. Other open formats, such as 7-Zip, offer better performance and even some proprietary formats, like RAR, have seen widespread use but for the most part ZIP is the go-to format. What muddies the waters here a bit is that the base ZIP format is open but some of the features added later on were not. However the majority of uses are based on the open standards.

Verdict: the open zip format is the most widely used standard.

Native Applications vs Web Apps

While applications may not, strictly speaking, be a format it does seem to be the case that every year there are stories about how Web Apps will soon replace Native Applications. So far however the results are a little mixed with e-mail being a perfect example of this paradox. For personal desktop e-mail web apps, mostly Gmail and the like, have largely replaced native applications like Microsoft Outlook and Thunderbird. On mobile however the majority of users still access their e-mail via native “apps”. And even then in enterprises the majority of e-mail usage is still done via native applications. I’m honestly not sure which will eventually win out, if either, but for now let’s call it a tie.

Verdict: tie.

The answer to the question is…

Well just on the five quick examples above we’ve got wins for 2 open formats, 2 closed/proprietary formats and one tie. So clearly based on market adoption we’re at a stand still.

Personally I’d prefer if open formats would take over because then I wouldn’t have to worry about my device supporting the format in question or not. Who knows, maybe by next year we’ll see one of the two pull ahead.

This post originally appeared on my website here.

 

Countdown to 2017!

December 1st, 2016 No comments

We’re almost done with 2016! Can you believe it? In order to give this year a proper send off I have decided to post something new every week day for the month of December until the new year! So if you feel like checking out what I’m sure will be the BEST. POSTS. EVAR. then be sure to come back every week day to see what’s new!

See you tomorrow ūüôā

Categories: Tyler B Tags:

Stop screen tearing with Nvidia/Intel graphics combo

November 29th, 2016 No comments

Ever since upgrading my laptop to Linux Mint 18 I’ve noticed some pronounced screen tearing happening. Initially I figured this was something I would simply have to live with due to the open source driver being used instead of the proprietary one, but after some Googling I found a way to actually fix the issue.

Following this post on Ask Ubuntu I created a new directory at /etc/X11/xorg.conf.d/ and then created a new file in there called 20-intel.conf. Inside of this file I placed the following text:

Section “Device”
Identifier ¬† ¬† ¬†“Intel Graphics”
Driver ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬†“intel”
Option ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬†“TearFree” ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬† ¬†“true”
EndSection

A quick reboot later and I’m happy to say that my screen no longer tears as I scroll down long web pages.

Even Borat agrees!

Even Borat agrees!