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Archive for the ‘Ubuntu’ Category

Limit Bandwitdth Used by apt-get

October 22nd, 2012 No comments

It’s easy. Simply throw “-o Acquire::http::Dl-Limit=X” in your apt-get command where X is the kb/s you wish to limit it to. So for example let’s say that you want to limit an apt-get upgrade command to roughly 50kb/s of bandwidth. Simply issue the following command:

sudo apt-get -o Acquire::http::Dl-Limit=50 upgrade

Simple right?




I am currently running a variety of distributions, primarily Linux Mint 17.
Previously I was running KDE 4.3.3 on top of Fedora 11 (for the first experiment) and KDE 4.6.5 on top of Gentoo (for the second experiment).
Check out my profile for more information.

Ubuntu 12.10 Beta 1 (Report #3)

September 22nd, 2012 No comments

Just a quick update on my experience running the pre-release version of Ubuntu (this time upgraded to Ubuntu 12.10 Beta 1!). Not a whole lot new to report – Beta 1 is basically the same as Alpha 3 but with the addition of an option to connect to a Remote Server directly from the login screen. Unfortunately the bugs that I have filed so far have yet to be resolved, but I’m still hopeful someone has a chance to correct them prior to release.

It is already almost the end of September which means there are only a couple more weeks before the official 12.10 launch. From what I’ve seen so far this upgrade will be a pretty small, evolutionary update to the already good 12.04 release.

Previous posts in this series:




I am currently running a variety of distributions, primarily Linux Mint 17.
Previously I was running KDE 4.3.3 on top of Fedora 11 (for the first experiment) and KDE 4.6.5 on top of Gentoo (for the second experiment).
Check out my profile for more information.
Categories: Tyler B, Ubuntu Tags: ,

Ubuntu 12.10 Alpha 3 (Report #2)

September 1st, 2012 No comments

Running an alpha version of an operating system, Linux or otherwise, is quite a different experience. It means, for instance, that you are not allowed to complain when minor things have bugs or simply don’t work – it is all par for the course, after all this is alpha software. That doesn’t mean however that when you do run into problems that it doesn’t still suck.

I ran into one of these problems earlier today while trying to connect via SSH to a remote computer within Nautilus. It seems that this release of the software is currently broken resulting in the following error message every time I try and browse my remote server’s directories:

The second really annoying issue I ran into was GIMP no longer showing menu items in Ubuntu’s global appmenu. This was especially infuriating because, prior to installing some updates today, it had worked perfectly fine in the past. I even had to hunt down a sub-par paint (GNU Paint) application just to crop the above screenshot.

Hopefully my annoying experiences, and subsequent bug filings, will prevent other users from experiencing the same pains when 12.10 is finally released to all. Here’s hoping anyway…

Update: It turns out that it wasn’t just the GIMP that wasn’t displaying menu items, no applications are. Off to file another bug…

Previous posts in this series:




I am currently running a variety of distributions, primarily Linux Mint 17.
Previously I was running KDE 4.3.3 on top of Fedora 11 (for the first experiment) and KDE 4.6.5 on top of Gentoo (for the second experiment).
Check out my profile for more information.
Categories: Tyler B, Ubuntu Tags:

Ubuntu 12.10 Alpha 3 (Report #1)

August 27th, 2012 No comments

Well it’s been a little while since I made the mistake (joking) of installing Ubuntu 12.10 Alpha 3. Here is what I’ve learned so far.

  1. My laptop really does not like the open source ATI graphics driver – and there are no proprietary drivers for this release yet. It’s not that the driver doesn’t perform well enough graphically, its just that it causes my card to give off more heat than the proprietary driver. This in turn causes my laptop’s fan to run non-stop and drains my battery at a considerable rate.
  2. Ubuntu has changed the way they do updates in this release. Instead of the old Update Manager there is a new application (maybe just a re-skinning of the old) that is much more refined and really quite simple. Interestingly enough the old hardware drivers application is also now gone, instead it is merged into the update manager. Overall I’m neutral on both changes.

    Updates are quite frequent when running an alpha release

  3. There is a new Online Accounts application (part of the system settings) included in this release. This application seems to work like an extension of the GNOME keyring – saving passwords for your various online accounts (go figure). I haven’t really had a chance to play around with it too much yet but it seems to work well enough.

That’s it for now. I’m off to file a bug over this open source driver that is currently melting my computer. I’ll keep you posted on how that goes.




I am currently running a variety of distributions, primarily Linux Mint 17.
Previously I was running KDE 4.3.3 on top of Fedora 11 (for the first experiment) and KDE 4.6.5 on top of Gentoo (for the second experiment).
Check out my profile for more information.
Categories: Tyler B, Ubuntu Tags: ,

Test driving the new Ubuntu (12.10)

August 26th, 2012 No comments

Call it crazy but I’ve decided to actually install an Ubuntu Alpha release, specifically Ubuntu 12.10 Alpha 3. Why would anyone in their right mind install an operating system that is bound to be full of bugs and likely destroy all of my data? My reasons are twofold:

  1. I regularly use Ubuntu or Ubuntu derivatives and would like to help in the process of making them better
  2. There are still a few quirks with my particular laptop that I would like to help iron out once and for all, hopefully correcting them in a more universal sense for Linux as a whole

So join me over the next few posts as I relate my most recent experiences running… shall we say, less than production code.

 




I am currently running a variety of distributions, primarily Linux Mint 17.
Previously I was running KDE 4.3.3 on top of Fedora 11 (for the first experiment) and KDE 4.6.5 on top of Gentoo (for the second experiment).
Check out my profile for more information.
Categories: Tyler B, Ubuntu Tags: ,

Building glibc for LFS from Ubuntu by replacing awk

November 23rd, 2011 No comments

If you run into the following error trying to build LFS from a Ubuntu installation:


make[1]: *** No rule to make target `/mnt/lfs/sources/glibc-build/Versions.all', needed by `/mnt/lfs/sources/glibc-build/abi-versions.h'. Stop.

The mawk utility installed with Ubuntu, and symlinked to /usr/bin/awk by default does not properly handle the regular expressions in this package. Perform the following commands:


# apt-get install gawk
# rm -rf /usr/bin/{m}awk
# ln -snf /usr/bin/gawk /usr/bin/awk

Then you’re just a make clean; ./configure –obnoxious-dash-commands; make; make install away from success.




I am currently running Ubuntu 14.04 LTS for a home server, with a mix of Windows, OS X and Linux clients for both work and personal use.
I prefer Ubuntu LTS releases without Unity - XFCE is much more my style of desktop interface.
Check out my profile for more information.

Ubuntu 11.10’s WiFi crashes my router

October 19th, 2011 9 comments

No seriously, it does. Whenever it makes a connection to the router it causes it to enter some bad state wherein it refuses to allow any connections to occur. This also has the effect of booting all other machines from the network. Apparently I’m not the only one to have this problem either.

I did manage to find a bit of a work around though:

  1. Set your wireless router to Mixed B/G mode only (yes I know, you lose out on N by doing this…)
  2. Enter the following into a terminal:
    echo "options iwlagn 11n_disable=1" | tee /etc/modprobe.d/iwlagn.confg
    sudo modprobe -rf iwlagn
    sudo modprobe -v iwlagn
    sudo service network-manager restart
  3. Maybe reboot?

I’ve also heard of some people getting it to work by enabling this instead of disabling it. To do so simply change the 11n_disable=1 line above to 11n_disable=0.

Hopefully they will have this annoying bug fixed soon.




I am currently running a variety of distributions, primarily Linux Mint 17.
Previously I was running KDE 4.3.3 on top of Fedora 11 (for the first experiment) and KDE 4.6.5 on top of Gentoo (for the second experiment).
Check out my profile for more information.
Categories: Tyler B, Ubuntu Tags: , , , ,

How to install sun-java6-jdk and Netbeans in Ubuntu 11.10

October 14th, 2011 9 comments

If you’ve recently upgraded to Ubuntu 11.10 and are a developer you may notice some things missing. For one there is no longer an option to install the sun-java6-jdk or JRE from the repositories. Worse they also removed the Netbeans IDE. Apparently this had something to do with licenses but if you’re going to offer MP3 support the least you could do is make software like this available for those who are willing to look for it.

Anyway with that rant out of the way I did manage to find a way to install both.

Install sun-java6-jdk

Following the instructions on this excellent post I was able to successfully install sun-java6-jdk using the following commands:

sudo add-apt-repository ppa:ferramroberto/java
sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install sun-java6-jdk sun-java6-plugin

There are alternative instructions for installing Java 7 as well.

Install Netbeans

My first attempt at installing both was to head to the official Oracle Java website and download the Netbeans + JDK installer. Unfortunately the installer seems to crash in this version of Ubuntu. However since the above process had installed the JRE I was able to simply grab the Netbeans only installer from Oracle which ended up working surprisingly well. Just remember to run it using sudo if you want other users to be able to use it as well.




I am currently running a variety of distributions, primarily Linux Mint 17.
Previously I was running KDE 4.3.3 on top of Fedora 11 (for the first experiment) and KDE 4.6.5 on top of Gentoo (for the second experiment).
Check out my profile for more information.
Categories: Tyler B, Ubuntu Tags: , ,

On Veetle, Linux Mint, and ICEauthority

September 21st, 2011 4 comments

Like most people, I use my computer for multimedia. Recently I’ve discovered a multi-platform program called Veetle. It’s a pretty good program, but I ran into an issue after having installed it on my system (currently running Linux Mint 11): while I was using it to stream video, my computer basically locked up – every running process continued working, but I had no control over it. Since I was watching a full-screen video, this was pretty unfortunate. After all, it often helps to be able to maneuver your windows when you’re in a bind. I also immediately noticed that I lost all sound control on my keyboard. I rebooted my computer, but when I tried to log in, I got an error telling me that my computer could not update /home/user/.ICEauthority, followed by another error message, which I’m assuming was related but of less importance.

I actually into this exact problem before on an older machine, but before I had the chance to investigate, the hard disk died (for unrelated reasons). Luckily, I recognized the error on my newer machine and put two and two together: both failures coincided with the installation of Veetle. Now, because I’m a nerd, I have two functioning and constantly active computers right next to each other, for just such an occasion! It may also be related to the fact that websites that stream media tend to be a bit iffy so I feel more secure not using my Windows machine while exploring them, but enough about that! I Googled (or Binged, assuming “Bong” or “Bung” isn’t the past tense) a solution.

The solution

As it turns out, other people have run into this same problem, and it’s been covered on the Ubuntu forums and elsewhere. Basically, I ran the Veetle script as root (D’oh!), and this royally boned everything. This post by mjcritchie at the ubuntu Forums (which follows the advice of tommcd at LinuxQuestions.org) explained what to do:

I have had the same problem twice, both times after updating (currently running 64bit Karmic).

Tried various solutions on the net, but this is the only one that worked for me:

Open a terminal and run:

Quote:
sudo chown -R user:user /home/user/.*

Where user is your user_name. This should change ownership of all the hidden files and directories in your home directory to: user:user, as they should be.

This comes courtesy of tommcd over at this post on LinuxQuestions.org

So there you have it. My machine currently works, and now I can get back to streaming media. At least until the next time I get too adventurous when installing things.

Ubuntu 11.04 Installer Fail

August 24th, 2011 3 comments

So I decided to take a go at Ubuntu 11.04 in a virtual machine before taking the leap and installing it for real. As I understand it, the new Unity desktop is a pretty major departure from the Gnome 2.x desktop that I’m used to, and I want to see if it’s as bad as it looks in the screenshots.

Unfortunately, I’ve yet to make it to the desktop, as Ubuntu has decided that it will take 42 minutes to download some language packs that I neither want or need.

Didn’t I tell it what language I speak as the first step of the install process? Surely this can be done later.




On my Laptop, I am running Linux Mint 12.
On my home media server, I am running Ubuntu 12.04
Check out my profile for more information.
Categories: God Damnit Linux, Jon F, Ubuntu Tags: