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OpenOffice.org needs snappier application names

September 13th, 2009 1 comment

Seriously, the names in OpenOffice.org are pretty bland – “Spreadsheet”, “Word Processor”, “Presentation”, etc. However, that’s pretty much the only fault I could find so far.

Word Processor

Earlier today I was visiting my family. My brother wanted to write a resume, but being completely new to the working world, he obviously needed some help. By complete coincidence, my parents didn’t feel like paying for Microsoft Office, so he has to use OpenOffice.The word processor is very intuitive and works just as well as Word. The only two difficulties I encountered were bullet formatting, which involved some guesswork with the horizontal rulers, and table formatting, which I’ll elucidate now.

Despite the fact that every company demands unformatted text resumes submitted online, I still like to make my resumes reasonably attractive in case I need a hard copy – this means screwing with tables, cells, and line colours and thicknesses. In MS Word, there’s a handy table toolbar with some drawing tools – namely the pencil, eraser, and the paintbrush. These tools allow users to select and manipulate individual line segments. OpenOffice’s Word Processor lacks this feature, and instead users have to select cells (individually or in groups) and and manipulate them. This is just as effective as MS Word, but a fair bit more cumbersome.

Overall, the resume turned out nicely and I only spent about five minutes troubleshooting the cell borders.

Spreadsheet

I mainly use spreadsheets to track my workouts and schedules. I found OO.o’s spreadsheet very easy to use and I transitioned from Excel seamlessly. It easily imported my old workout XLS files and doesn’t seem to have had any problems. In addition, the formatting worked as desired and took no extra time. OO.o’s macros worked as expected and definitely added some time-saving convenience.

Categories: Free Software, Sasha D Tags:

Challenger Approaching: Phil tries to install openSUSE

September 13th, 2009 No comments

I’m the newest guinea pig in this experiment, and yes, I’m a few days late joining up. Since I’ve already become comfortable with Ubuntu, I decided to choose openSUSE for my distribution. However, because I do a lot of Windows development for both of my jobs, I’ll be the only participant of this experiment who’ll be dual booting.

Before you go and cry foul, I checked the rules very carefully. The rules state: “[you] must use the distribution on your primary computer and it must be your primary day-to-day computing environment”. That means that as long as I use it 50.1% of the time, I’ll be within the bounds of the experiment. Of course I plan to use it considerably more than 50.1% of the time.

While everyone else in the experiment has been starting to finally get their computers to a productive state, I’m just started installed openSUSE last Tuesday. I might have had some time to start getting my shit in order, however my first attempt to burn the openSUSE DVD was met with a burn error.

Wasted DVD Count: 1

Not wanting to risk installing from a faulty disc, I burnt it again. Same error. Out of boredom, I figured “what’s the worst that can happen?” and tried to install anyways. Needless to say, the installation failed about 3/4 through, but Windows booted anyways so I figured I’d be okay.

Wasted DVD Count: 2

My next step was to re-download the ISO, then try to burn the disc again from another computer. Shockingly, I encountered the same burn error. Since the last failed burn attempt didn’t completely ruin my system, I figured I’d try it again. Again I was met by disastrous failure, but this time, Windows would not boot.

Wasted DVD Count: 3

After using my Windows 7 RC disc to “repair Windows”, I finally got the system to boot. However, it took over 30 minutes from power on to functional desktop. Immediately I ran a disk defrag and scheduled a checkdisk, and went to bed.

The analysis alone for the defrag took around 4 hours [I know because I happened to wake up in the middle of the night and decided to go check it, and it was about 90% done]. Incase you’ve never run a disk defrag, that’s WAY above normal. In the morning I ran the actual defrag, and it took about 2 hours. Once it finished, I rebooted to start the checkdisk – which hadn’t finished before I left for work 2 hours later. When I got home, 5.5 hours after I started the checkdisk, it was just finishing. In total it took 6 hours. Windows now ran smoothly, but was lacking sound, and nothing I could do made it work. So I re-installed Windows 7 and everything was back to normal before I started trying to install openSUSE.

I decided to burn another copy of the openSUSE install disc, and ran the media check that’s installed on the disc. Around 3/4 of the way through the check it failed. Running it on another machine yielded the same result.

Wasted DVD Count: 4

I decided to get a MD5 program to verify the integrity of the ISO’s I downloaded. They both matched perfectly to the MD5 provided on the openSUSE download page, so with few options left, I asked Tyler to download a copy of the ISO and burn it. Although there was a burn error in that process as well, I decided to run the Media Check on that DVD as well. Surprisingly it succeeded and I proceeded to attempt to install openSUSE.

One of the nice things about openSUSE is that it proposes either a partition based or an LVM based method for installing the OS. Usually, this involved shrinking the Windows partition and using the available space for Boot, Swap, Home, and Root partitions. Because of all the screwing around with hard drive partitions and disk fragmentation, openSUSE was unable to shrink my Windows partition to roughly 40 GB. Instead, I had to boot back into Windows 7, shrink the partition there, and then manually assign partitions from within the openSUSE installer. I ended up choosing to set aside 4GB for my Swap partition [2 * the amount of RAM I have], and to group Home, Root, and Boot into one partition with the remaining 26 GB.

So on Friday night [or Saturday morning] openSUSE finally booted, taking up 5 DVD’s in the process. More to come on making openSUSE do my bidding.

Categories: God Damnit Linux, openSUSE, Phil D Tags:

How to not install XBMC on Debian Lenny

September 13th, 2009 4 comments

So tonight I got a terrible idea. I figured that I’d try to install XBMC, the awesome media centre app for modded Xbox consoles. Turns out that they do, in fact, have a Linux version… but that none of it’s dependencies can be resolved automatically, and that every developer remotely related to the project was on crack while packing the tarball.

Because the devs only package a release for Ubuntu (that doesn’t work worth a shit on Debian), I was forced to download a tarball from this site, which I extracted to my home/username/bin directory. Unfortunately, when attempting to./configure in this directory, I discovered that the package had roughly 337 thousand dependencies, namely:

subversion make g++ gcc gawk pmount libtool nasm automake cmake gperf unzip bison libsdl-dev libsdl-image1.2-dev libsdl-gfx1.2-dev libsdl-mixer1.2-dev libsdl-sound1.2-dev libsdl-stretch-dev libfribidi-dev liblzo-dev libfreetype6-dev libsqlite3-dev libogg-dev libasound-dev python-sqlite libglew-dev libcurl4-dev x11proto-xinerama-dev libxinerama-dev libxrandr-dev libxrender-dev libmad0-dev libogg-dev libvorbis-dev libmysqlclient-dev libpcre3-dev libdbus-1-dev libhal-dev libhal-storage-dev libjasper-dev libfontconfig-dev libbz2-dev libboost-dev libfaac-dev libenca-dev libxt-dev libxmu-dev libpng-dev libjpeg-dev libpulse-dev mesa-utils libcdio-dev

Yeah. That many. Further, the library liblzo-dev is no longer a part of Debian Lenny, although it is available from the Etch repositories. You can grab that tarball and manually install it from this page. Oh, and you’ll also need to add the debian-multimedia non-free repositories to your sources.list file in order to obtain libdvdcss… You can find instructions to do that here.

Assuming you’re still with me, and have managed to install all of the above dependencies (all 300+ MB of them), you’ll probably still fail, because the tarballs for the vast majority of them fail to set execute permissions on their configure files on extraction. As such, you’ll have to manually walk through each of the folders under xbmc and add those permissions…

After adding these permissions as deep as I could in the directory structure with the command chmod -R +x */configure (where you can add up to 6 instances of */), and running the XBMC config file a solid 50+ times, I’m stuck on the libdvdnav library, which doesn’t seem to contain a valid config file… Seeing as I have to work tomorrow, I offically give up for now. Christ this must be a small taste of what Gentoo is like all the time.

The Next Morning:

With a clear head and a fresh cup of coffee, I took another shot at installing XBMC.After spending 20 minutes manually installing the libdvdnav, libdvdread, and libdvdcss libraries, I finally managed to run the XBMC configure script with no errors.

After just over a half hour compiling, I finally got XBMC installed and gave it a test run.

Initially, I had troubles connecting to any network shares where my media is stored. After going into the network settings, changing my workgroup name, and telling the app to automatically mount SMB shares, everything seemed peachy.

More to come as I figure this out