Archive for November, 2009

Why Linux is great for web development

November 27th, 2009 1 comment

Linux is great for web development, but not necessarily for the obvious reasons. The reason I find developing websites and server programs much better on a Linux machine than on a Windows machine is as simple as the following three letters SSH.

SSH stands for Secure SHell and is a way to remotely log into a server over a secure connection. While you can connect to SSH shares in Windows, connecting to one under Linux is a far more integrated experience. For example in KDE’s Dolphin you can connect to the SSH share right within the file browser itself. Then, as you do work, changes can be reflected instantly to the remote server. This saves you a lot of time instead of having to use (S)FTP to transfer files to and from the server. GNOME also has a similar ability through its Connect to Server menu.

Again there are Windows programs that will mirror changes in a local directory to a remote server through SSH but as far as I know Windows Explorer itself does not have this ability (FTP but no SSH?). So next time you are in the mood for web dev, give Linux a shot!

I am currently running a variety of distributions, primarily Linux Mint 17.
Previously I was running KDE 4.3.3 on top of Fedora 11 (for the first experiment) and KDE 4.6.5 on top of Gentoo (for the second experiment).

A lengthy, detailed meta-analysis of studies of GNOME Do

November 23rd, 2009 11 comments

GNOME Do is a fantastic little program that makes Linux Mint a very comfortable experience. At first glance, GNOME Do just looks like a collection of launchers that can be docked to your window, with a search function attached for completeness. What stands out about Do, though, is that the search function offers a lot of versatility. Through Do, I can launch programs, mount and unmount drives, bring up folders, and execute a variety of actions through the plug-ins. I’ve found that it saves me a lot of mouse movement (yes, I’m that lazy) when I’m working on assignments. In less than two seconds, I can call up Kate to start up my data entry, start up R in terminal, open the folder containing all of my data, and start a conversation in Pidgin. Best of all, since the search function can be called up with the Super+Space key combination, I can do all of this without ever having to switch windows.

I also find that Do helps to clean up the clutter on my desktop. I’ve got it set up as the Docky theme on the bottom of my screen. Since I have no need for the panel, I’ve got it set up to autohide at the top of my monitor. This means when I have something maximized, it legitimately takes up the entire monitor.

What a beautifully clean desktop.

What a beautifully clean desktop.

Adding or removing programs to or from Do is a cinch too – it’s as simple as dragging and dropping.

Unfortunately, it’s not all great

Like every other Linux program, Do saves time and effort. Like every other Linux program, Do also costs time and effort in the bugs that it has. The most frustrating bug I’ve had so far is that Do simply disappears on a restart. It runs and in a manner it “exists” since I can resize it on my desktop, but I can’t actually see or use it. Apparently this is a known bug, and I haven’t been able to find a decent solution to it. It’s especially unfortunate because Do provides so much convenience that when it doesn’t work properly, I feel like I’m reverting to some primitive age where I’m dependent on my mouse (the horror!)

Notice how the cursor is cut off? In reality, it's a resizing cursor, used to resize an invisible panel. It technically does work since after I reboot I find that GNOME Do inadvertently takes up half my screen.

Notice how the cursor is cut off? In reality, it's a resizing cursor, used to resize an invisible panel. It technically does function, since after I reboot I find that GNOME Do inadvertently takes up half my screen.

Regardless, I’d recommend Do for anyone who can install it. When it works, it’s great for saving you some time and effort; when it doesn’t, well, ’tis better to have loved and lost….

Today, the search engines…

November 23rd, 2009 No comments

I would just like to point out that thanks to you the readers, who I’d like to reinforce are fantastic and have been a huge help to us (as well as making us feel good that people are making use of the site!) have catapulted us to previously unknown heights in the world of Canadian search engine fame!

The big three search engines with Canadian domains – Google, Bing, and Yahoo – have all launched us up to top-shelf status on their search pages with a search string of ‘The Linux Experiment’: – first search result (yay!) – first search result (double yay!) – second search result (darn you, PC World)

Let’s collectively step it up and get us to the top of the Google search charts.  With a scant 38 days left in the Experiment, time is quickly running out!

Today, the search engines… tomorrow, the (PC) world!

Back to relative stability with Funtoo

November 21st, 2009 No comments

In my last post, I’d mentioned that I planned on reinstalling Gentoo to fix several dependency issues that had made upgrading packages an impossibility. I chose to use the Funtoo variant and have since become an expert with the install process.

My first attempt was an installation of Funtoo unstable, which included packages that are normally masked out for stability reasons. This particular installation went fine and worked properly, until the hard drive I’d installed it on decided that it had better things to do than spin up when booting the computer. The end result was a kernel panic on boot and inability to mount the drive. One thing that I did notice under GNOME 2.28 is that “alacarte”, the menu editor, is not installed as a default package or chained as a dependency. As a result, the “Edit Menus” option in GNOME merely displayed a list of installed applications, with no way to add new ones or edit the properties of existing ones.

The latest and most current version I’m running now is Funtoo stable. It’s a very snappy and responsive environment, and I haven’t yet run into package conflicts or dependency problems. Unfortunately, two of my most-used apps (Songbird and VLC) have problems running – VLC refuses to display a user interface (but runs in a terminal seemingly properly), and Songbird insists that my request to play a song should be met with a core media error. I may end up trying the mailing list or IRC channel to see what the level of support is for VLC at least, or the appropriate process for migrating a “stable” release to the “unstable” one.

Update: I’m apparently plagued with the “didn’t read the documentation” curse. Here’s what VLC says when I try to reinstall it:

 * Messages for package media-video/vlc-1.0.3:

 * You have disabled the qt4 useflag, vlc will not have any
 * graphical interface. Maybe that is not what you want...

I’m not sure if I really want to build it with QT support… but in the meantime, I’ve added “media-video/vlc qt4” to the /etc/portage/package.use file and it seems to work fine.

I am currently running Ubuntu 14.04 LTS for a home server, with a mix of Windows, OS X and Linux clients for both work and personal use.
I prefer Ubuntu LTS releases without Unity - XFCE is much more my style of desktop interface.
Check out my profile for more information.

Eclipse… Again

November 21st, 2009 No comments

Man I’m beginning to sound like a broken record. Last night I reinstalled my Debian system. Somewhere along the line, I made a mess with my repositories, and as Wayne suggested in the comments on one of my previous posts, a good way to avoid many of these issues is to install your Testing system directly from a netinst daily build cd image instead of installing Lenny and then upgrading.

So I did. Upon inserting the install disc and attempting to use the graphical installer, I was confronted with a terminal spewing error messages about missing drivers or something. Figuring that this was just an error related to the daily installer build, I backed out of the graphical installer and took a shot at the expert install. Now that I know my way around Linux, the expert installer isn’t so daunting, and the rest of the process went smoothly, although it took awhile.

This morning, I figured I’d be productive and write some Java on my freshly installed system. So I went over to synaptic, and searched out Eclipse… only to find that it didn’t exist in the Testing repositories. How strange. A google and a half later and I had found that eclipse is available in Lenny, as well as Sid, but is conspicuously absent from Testing. What to do?

I hit the #debian IRC channel and asked for a bit of help, which i promptly got, in the form of these instructions:

  1. Add the line deb-src sid main non-free contrib to your sources list.
  2. From a root terminal, run apt-get update
  3. From a root terminal, run apt-get install build-essential
  4. Navigate to an empty directory somewhere on your system
  5. Run apt-get build-dep eclipse. This will download almost 200MB of source code to your system. Don’t do it over a wireless connection like I did.
  6. Run apt-get -b source eclipse. Don’t worry if this step takes forever – it took almost an hour on my system.
  7. install the resultant debs. This step is painful, because while all of the dependencies will have been created for you, there is a certain order to installing them that requires a bit of trial and error to figure out.

So after a little over an hour of messing about, I have a working Eclipse install on my system, and can get some real work done. It was frustrating, but hey, thanks to the guys over at #debian, it wasn’t the end of the world.

On my Laptop, I am running Linux Mint 12.
On my home media server, I am running Ubuntu 12.04
Check out my profile for more information.

Fedora 12: Drenched in glory

November 20th, 2009 6 comments

Let me start off by saying that my experience thus far (over the last 24 hours) with Fedora 12 – Constantine has been the complete opposite from Tyler’s.  For the most part, at any rate.  While I, too attempted to do a preupgrade (from terminal) to Constantine and had it fail due to an insufficiently sized /boot partition – the 200 MB that it suggests on install is simply not enough – my clean install attempt went smooth as silk.

After backing everything important (user folder) up to my server, which over gigabit ethernet took all of 12 minutes, I popped the Fedora 12 x86_64 DVD into my drive and restarted.   Installation and drive partitioning was easy, as was customizing my installation repositories to include Fedora 12 x86_64 and Fedora 12 x86_64 updates – this has saved me a lot of headaches now, I’m sure.  I also decided this time around to add KDE at boot time, just to see if this would simplify my problems with that environment; more on that in a later post, I’m sure.

As of right now I’m running a stable – though desktop effects-less – Gnome environment.  Boot time over Fedora 11 has significantly improved, and the boot animation is a great improvement over the scrolling bar from Fedora 11.  In addition, off the bat my computer automatically supported native resolution (no-go without drivers in Fedora 11) and screen brightness changing (same story there in Leonidas).

One other thing that GREATLY excites me – folder mounting of my Windows Home Server shares has increased in speed tenfold.  It’s almost instant now, much like it would be in Windows – fantastic!

Though frustrated by the idea of having to re-configure Wine and vpnc (that took me FOREVER!), and waiting for nVidia or a kmod driver to come out that supports my GeForce 8600M GS for enabling desktop effects and my beloved Gnome DO, I’m pleasantly surprised by my experience thus far.

More to come soon!

Categories: Dana H, Fedora, Free Software, GNOME, KDE, Linux Tags:

Unstable & Not Ready – Uninstalling Fedora 12 24-Hours Later

November 20th, 2009 9 comments

Well it has been 24 hours since I first installed Fedora 12 and I am ready to uninstall it. Even after trying to enable 3D graphics with an experimental graphics driver, because the official ATI is not yet ready, I am still experiencing graphical abnormalities, application crashes, and sluggish performance all over. This is not the kind of experience that I can deal with day after day on my primary machine.

I believe most of these issues are just par for the course with Fedora. By that I mean, the Fedora developers love to live on the bleeding edge of technology and unfortunately this time around they didn’t wait for the basic foundation to be ready before shipping. I’m sure within the next couple of weeks, or months at the most, all of my issues will be ironed out. Until then I am reverting back to trusty “old” Fedora 11.

I am currently running a variety of distributions, primarily Linux Mint 17.
Previously I was running KDE 4.3.3 on top of Fedora 11 (for the first experiment) and KDE 4.6.5 on top of Gentoo (for the second experiment).

I Cannot Has Eclipse?

November 20th, 2009 No comments
Screenshot-Add-Remove Applications

You know, that's interesting, as I'm quite certain that I've installed Eclipse on x86 hardware before...

On my Laptop, I am running Linux Mint 12.
On my home media server, I am running Ubuntu 12.04
Check out my profile for more information.

Fedora 12 Graphics [Update]

November 19th, 2009 No comments

I stumbled upon this news thread which mentioned open source ATI driver support through the use of the mesa-dri-drivers-experimental package. Promptly installing this

yum install mesa-dri-drivers-experimental

and a quick reboot later and my desktop seems to have actual 3D graphics support! It’s not perfect but it will certainly do until ATI gets in gear with their own Fedora 12 release.

I am currently running a variety of distributions, primarily Linux Mint 17.
Previously I was running KDE 4.3.3 on top of Fedora 11 (for the first experiment) and KDE 4.6.5 on top of Gentoo (for the second experiment).

Installing Fedora 12

November 19th, 2009 1 comment

With the recent release of Fedora 12 it is high time that I upgrade from my existing Fedora 11 install to the new wonders that surely await me. So I hopped over to google and did a quick search and came across the official documentation to upgrade Fedora. My plan was to try and upgrade to see how it works and then eventually do a full re-install just to clear out any cobwebs that have developed over the past couple of months. Without further ado here we go!

Attempt #1: Upgrade

Because the Fedora repositories now use LZMA as the compression algorithm for packages the first thing I needed to do was upgrade rpm

yum update rpm

Next I needed to add rawhide (the current software repository) to my list of repositories.

yum –enablerepo=rawhide –skip-broken upgrade

Once that was done I ran a simple update and was presented with literally thousands of updates.

That's a lot of updates!

That's a lot of updates!

Unfortunately this failed a dependency resolution. Doing some more reading I found out that the dependencies might in fact be OK, but that the older version of yum just can’t resolve them correctly. So I tried updating yum to see if that would make a difference.

yum upgrade yum

Trying once again I was met with utter failure. Still unresolved dependencies! Turning back to the Internet I found out that Fedora actually maintains a separate set of instructions which include the use of a graphical upgrader! Entering:

yum install preupgrade


and I had the upgrade wizard running on my screen. A couple of quick clicks and I was off to the races. I started the download phase and went to bed as I figured it could take a while to complete.

In the morning I was presented with a dialog telling me to restart, which I did. On the next boot a Fedora installer appeared and began to fully install the system. All was going well until disaster struck.

There was an error running your transaction for the following reason(s): insufficient disk space.

Clicking the details arrow gave me more information saying that

You need more space on the following file systems:

18 M on /mnt/sysimage/boot

With no other options I clicked Exit Installer and hopped for the best. Eventually I had to hit the power button on my computer to restart it. Thankfully this allowed me to reboot into my existing Fedora 11 install.

Attempt #2: Re-Install KDE Live CD

After giving up on trying an upgrade I decided to simply download the newest version of the Fedora 12 x64 KDE Live CD. Unfortunately rather than being a smooth installation I had the installer itself crash on me at least 4 different times. Figuring it might be an issue with the x64 version I even tried installing from the Fedora 12 x86 KDE Live CD which ultimately had the same issues. All of these attempts had trashed the data on my hard drive – good thing I did a back up first!

Attempt #3: Re-Install DVD

Getting frustrated I then turned to the old trusty DVD install which I had used previously to install Fedora 11. The unfortunate part about installing Fedora this way is that it defaults to a GNOME desktop. Yes, true, you can select KDE from the installer but last time I did that I got a hodgepodge of KDE with GNOME apps everywhere. Even my network manager was a GNOME application.

Being very careful I inspected the package selections and tried to make this install as KDE-ish as possible. I noticed that even after selecting KDE as your desktop environment, Fedora defaults to installing the GNOME network manager so I deselected that and found knetworkmanager instead. I also added a few other programs, themes, icon sets, etc. that I thought would be useful. Finally I added Armacycles Advanced for install, because honestly it’s great.

If you haven't played it DO IT NOW

If you haven't played it DO IT NOW

Hitting Next the install began. 2,074 packages and counting…

A quick reboot later and I was presented with the install and configuration wizard where I set up my user accounts and system date & time. The install was a success.

Not Problem Free

My install, while complete, is not without its fair share of problems. The graphics module that I had been using with great success under Fedora 11 is just not present in Fedora 12. I googled the problem and it seems that they have yet to release a version for Fedora 12. Without proper graphics drivers my system stability is suffering greatly.

In addition KPackageKit is incredibly slow for some unknown reason. It’s slow to launch, slow to respond, and slow to close. I hope this is something that can be rectified shortly.

Other than that I don’t really have many complaints. The boot time on this version of Fedora is much faster and I can only assume with the new kernel that the overall hardware compatibility has improved as well.

Stay tuned for my first impressions in a later post.

My New Desktop

Here is my new desktop. If you look closely you can even see some of the graphical issues that plague my system.

Here is my new desktop. If you look closely you can even see some of the graphical issues that plague my system.

I am currently running a variety of distributions, primarily Linux Mint 17.
Previously I was running KDE 4.3.3 on top of Fedora 11 (for the first experiment) and KDE 4.6.5 on top of Gentoo (for the second experiment).

Configuring BlueZync and Failing at Barry

November 6th, 2009 1 comment

After successfully compiling and installing the BlueZync for Thunderbird plugin last night, I decided to take a shot at actually synchronizing my Blackberry with Thunderbird. The first step was a little bit of configuration. For that, I followed this guide on the BlueZync website.

Everything was going fine until I got to the section entitled “Mozilla plugin for OpenSync.” In this section, you are instructed to execute the command ldconfig -p | grep, which checks if the file is registered as a symlink on your system. After finding out that it was not, I entered the command locate from a root terminal, and found three locations for the file in question on my system. I then used the line export LD_LIBRARY_PATH=/usr/lib/icedove:/usr/lib/iceowl:/usr/lib/xulrunner-1.9 to register the symlink. Unfortunately, even after running the export command, ldconfig failed to find the link. Although this one will probably bite me in the ass later on, I’ll skip it for now.

At this point in the install process, I could access the BlueZync settings panel from within Thunderbird, and run the command line osynctool –listplugins and see the mozilla-sync plugin listed, which is the part of the BlueZync suite that really interests me. mozilla-sync is a plugin for OpenSync that should allow me to interface my Blackberry with Thunderbird (with the help of the Barry libraries, which provide another OpenSync plugin that communicates with the phone).

To continue, it was necessary to install all of the elements of the Barry libraries in order to get their OpenSync plugin that would complete the chain. This is where I may have committed my second cardinal sin – dpkg notified me that in order to install the opensync-plugin-barry package, I had to install a version of the libopensync0 package that was between v0.22 and v0.3. As I understand it, Bluezync already installed some version of OpenSync onto my machine, and I have a feeling that reinstalling a different version may ruin all of the progress that I’ve made thus far.

Indeed, after finishing the Barry install and running osynctool –listplugins again, mozilla-sync was still listed, but opensync-plugin-barry was not. This is strange, as in my last three attempts at this process, getting Barry to show up was the easy part. Now the tables have turned, and I have what I assume to be a properly working BlueZync install, but without the Barry component that would make it all work with my phone.

Back to the proverbial drawing board with me…

On my Laptop, I am running Linux Mint 12.
On my home media server, I am running Ubuntu 12.04
Check out my profile for more information.

Going Linux podcast

November 5th, 2009 No comments

Just wanted to take a quick moment to thank the gentlemen over at Going Linux for mentioning us on their most recent podcast. They certainly have discussed many interesting topics over the course of the last 83(!) podcasts and seem to always have some new tip or trick waiting on deck to tell us all about! I highly recommend their podcast to anyone looking to learn new things about Linux.

Thanks again guys!

P.S. Don’t forget to check out our podcast while you’re at it 😉

I am currently running a variety of distributions, primarily Linux Mint 17.
Previously I was running KDE 4.3.3 on top of Fedora 11 (for the first experiment) and KDE 4.6.5 on top of Gentoo (for the second experiment).
Categories: Linux, Podcast, Tyler B Tags: ,

Twelve to twelve

November 5th, 2009 3 comments

Well, it’s official – twelve more days remain until the November 17 release of Fedora 12 (Constantine).  I, for one, can hardly wait – Fedora 11 has been rock-solid for me so far (under Gnome, anyways – but I’ll leave that subject alone) and I can only imagine that Fedora 12 is going to bring more of the same my way.

Among some of the more notable changes being made that caught my interest:

  • Gnome 2.28 – the current version bundled into my Fedora 11 distribution, 2.26.3, has been nothing but amazing.  Unflinchingly stable, fast, and reliable – it’s everything I want in a desktop environment.
  • Better webcam support – not sure how this can get any better from my perspective since my LG P300’s built-in webcam worked straight out of the box on Fedora 11, but I’m interested to see exactly what they bring to the table here
  • Better IPv6 support – since our router does actively support this protocol, it’s nice to see Fedora taking charge and always improving the standard
  • Better power management – for me, this is a major headache under Gnome (I know, I know…) since it really doesn’t let me customize anything as much as I would like to.   Among other things, it’s supposed to offer better support for wake-from-disk and wake-from-RAM.  We’ll see.

I’m sure that Tyler and I will keep you posted as the due date gets closer, and especially once we’ve done the upgrade itself!

(Finally) Installing Bluezync for Thunderbird

November 5th, 2009 1 comment

After some constructive comments from Henrik, the developer of the BlueZync plugin for Thunderbird, I decided to take another shot at getting Blackberry sync working on Linux. This time, instead of making up my own instructions, I actually followed his (which have been updated somewhat since my last visit).

Surprisingly, when I followed the instructions to the letter, the plugin built correctly the first time without any problems. When I launched Icedove (the Debian rebranding of Mozilla Thunderbird), the plugin even loaded correctly! If you’ve read my past posts detailing this process, you’ll feel as incredulous as I did.

The only trouble that I ran into along the way was actually with version 0.9 of the Lightning plugin for Icedove (Thunderbird). Upon installation of the plugin, I was not able to create a calendar, an event, or a task. Turns out that this Ubuntu bug applies to Debian as well, and that the problem can be easily fixed by uninstalling Lightning, downloading and installing the libstdc++5 package, and reinstalling the Lightning plugin. For whatever reason, I could not find this package in the Debian Testing repositories, and instead downloaded and installed it from the Lenny repositories.

With that issue solved, I tried running the ./ script, and was met yet again with a slew of failed tests:

21% tests passed, 15 tests failed out of 19

The following tests FAILED:
5 – thunderbird (Failed)
6 – tbird_empty (Failed)
7 – tbird_slow (Failed)
8 – tbird_slow_3 (Failed)
9 – tbird_fast (Failed)
10 – tbird_add (Failed)
11 – tbird_delete (Failed)
12 – tbird_modify (Failed)
13 – light_empty (Failed)
14 – light_slow (Failed)
15 – light_slow_3 (Failed)
16 – light_fast (Failed)
17 – light_add (Failed)
18 – light_delete (Failed)
19 – light_modify (Failed)

However, unlike in past attempts at this install, this time the Bluezync plugin is visible from within Thunderbird… Now all I have to figure out is how to use it. More on that later.

On my Laptop, I am running Linux Mint 12.
On my home media server, I am running Ubuntu 12.04
Check out my profile for more information.

Once again, portage perplexes and enrages me

November 3rd, 2009 No comments

I haven’t needed to reinstall my system nearly as many times as Jon or Tyler, which is a good thing – Linux is supposed to be reasonably stable once it’s up and running, right? My first reinstall of Gentoo was based on a circular dependency with portage, but left me with a stable system that was running GNOME until I tried emerging world. (This is the Gentoo equivalent of “apt-get update && apt-get upgrade”.)

This morning’s fiasco involved the system still thinking that QT3 was installed, even though I’d specifically removed the “kde” flag from my make.conf file. After repeatedly trying to unmerge and purge the unwanted KDE packages from my system, I ran “revdep-rebuild” (suggested on for the particular OGG library that was refusing to compile) which threw all the KDE packages back in place – and worse, suggested a dependency on GNOME!

There are too many issues that can occur when your system won’t update. I have a client’s Windows machine rebuilding because FakeXPA and “Windows Antivirus Pro” snuck past Symantec AntiVirus – and with new remote exploits coming out all the time, I don’t need my SSH server compromised by a script kiddie.

As a result, I’m currently installing a variant of Gentoo called Funtoo Linux, which uses the same portage package management system but differs in its use of source control, initialization scripts and core overlays. It uses the Gentoo LiveCD to install, and appears to have a more liberal approach as to which packages are available at any point in time. I also agree with Daniel Robbins’ approach to blockers and blocked packages, which has been hashed out on the Gentoo bug tracker in great detail. Wish me luck!

I am currently running Ubuntu 14.04 LTS for a home server, with a mix of Windows, OS X and Linux clients for both work and personal use.
I prefer Ubuntu LTS releases without Unity - XFCE is much more my style of desktop interface.
Check out my profile for more information.

Making glut.h work in Fedora 11

November 2nd, 2009 3 comments

As part of a computer graphics course I am taking at university I need to be able to develop C/C++ applications using openGL and the openGL Utility Toolkit (GLUT). I tried using many different C/C++ IDEs, including Eclipse, before I finally settled on MonoDevelop as my IDE of choice. After trying for some time to get this to work in a way similar to what I am used to on Windows, I finally gave up on the compilation errors and consulted the GOOG. As this all actually happened about 2 weeks ago I am a little cloudy where I discovered this tidbit of information but it turns out that even after you install freeglut through yum,

sudo yum install freeglut freeglut-devel

it doesn’t actually register the glut.h library correctly. Unfortunately due to the aforementioned registration issue, MonoDevelop was unable to load glut.h. I was able to rectify this by creating my own pkgconfig file, glut.pc, and placing it under /usr/lib64/pkgconfig.

Here is what I placed in my custom created glut.pc file that seemed to do the job:


Name: glut
Description: Mesa OpenGL Utility Toolkit library
Requires: gl glu
Version: 7.6.0
Libs: -L${libdir} -lglut
Cflags: -I${includedir}

So yeah, that’s it! This seems to be a very common problem so hopefully what I have described here works for you as well.

I am currently running a variety of distributions, primarily Linux Mint 17.
Previously I was running KDE 4.3.3 on top of Fedora 11 (for the first experiment) and KDE 4.6.5 on top of Gentoo (for the second experiment).

Back at Square 1

November 2nd, 2009 2 comments

This morning I reinstalled my Debian system. I began by downloading an ISO for the current Debian Stable build (called Lenny), and installing it with the graphical installer. That done, I used a couple of my old posts to get my wireless firmware installed and to upgrade my system to the Testing repositories.

Unfortunately, I have realized that a clean install of Debian Linux is a pretty plain place to be in. Even though I have the benefit of my old writings to help me get up to speed, some, like the ones dealing with how to get Compiz working properly, are somewhat lacking in detail.

Naturally, I’ve replaced all of the problems that running multiple desktop environments was causing with all of the problems that an entirely unconfigured system can cause. I’ve already mentioned that I haven’t gotten Compiz working yet (whenever I turn it on, all of my window decorations disappear), and there is some error with Postgre that causes Synaptic and Aptitude to complain whenever I make changes to my system:

E: postgresql-8.4: subprocess installed post-installation script returned error exit status 1
E: postgresql: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
E: postgresql-contrib-8.4: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured
E: postgresql-contrib: dependency problems – leaving unconfigured

Most stressing is the fact that I cannot get into the preferences for the Nautilus file system browser. Whenever I try to open the preferences dialog from the edit menu, it (and most of GNOME) crash. Running Nautilus from the terminal yields me this output:

(nautilus:4213): Gtk-CRITICAL **: gtk_combo_box_append_text: assertion `GTK_IS_COMBO_BOX (combo_box)’ failed

(nautilus:4213): GLib-GObject-CRITICAL **: g_object_set_data_full: assertion `G_IS_OBJECT (object)’ failed

(nautilus:4213): Gtk-CRITICAL **: gtk_widget_set_sensitive: assertion `GTK_IS_WIDGET (widget)’ failed

(nautilus:4213): GLib-GObject-WARNING **: invalid (NULL) pointer instance

(nautilus:4213): GLib-GObject-CRITICAL **: g_signal_connect_data: assertion `G_TYPE_CHECK_INSTANCE (instance)’ failed

(nautilus:4213): GLib-GObject-WARNING **: invalid (NULL) pointer instance

(nautilus:4213): GLib-GObject-CRITICAL **: g_signal_handlers_block_matched: assertion `G_TYPE_CHECK_INSTANCE (instance)’ failed

(nautilus:4213): GLib-GObject-CRITICAL **: g_object_get_data: assertion `G_IS_OBJECT (object)’ failed
Segmentation fault

Actually, the terminal prints output similar to the above, but so much of it that this post would take up most of the front page of the site were I to post it all. I have no idea what the hell any of that means, or how it got into my system, or why I cannot get into the preferences panel of Nautilus as a result.

Until I do figure it out, I’ll be spending a lot of time on the #debian channel. Along with these major problems come a number of small tasks, like adding myself to the sudo keyring, adding the Testing repository keys to my sources list so that it stops yelling that all of my software is unverifiable.

Fucking Linux.

On my Laptop, I am running Linux Mint 12.
On my home media server, I am running Ubuntu 12.04
Check out my profile for more information.

Reinstalling Linux

November 2nd, 2009 2 comments

Generally, after using a Windows machine for close to a year, it gets bogged down and slow and benefits greatly from a reinstall. After about 2 months of using Linux, and installing three different desktop managers on top of one another, I’ve found the same with my Linux install.

I attribute most of the problems that I’ve been having to the relationship between XFCE and KDE. After installing KDE and playing with it for one evening, I hightailed it back to XFCE, and found that many of  the options that I set in KDE leeched their way back into XFCE.

For instance, all of the window decoration that I set in KDE, the default web browser and file manager all persist in XFCE. Thanks to the light weight way that XFCE handles settings (read: it doesn’t save them, and doesn’t listen to ones that you do set, so don’t expect it to), most of KDE has leeched into my XFCE install.

This, along with a few other minor problems that I’ve been having lately, as well as a curiosity about what the install process would be like now that I know what I’m doing, have lead me to attempting a fresh install. Ideally, I’ll be back up and running within an hour.

Cheers, and wish me luck.

On my Laptop, I am running Linux Mint 12.
On my home media server, I am running Ubuntu 12.04
Check out my profile for more information.
Categories: Debian, Jon F, KDE, XFCE Tags: , , , ,

Resizing batches of images in Nautilus

November 1st, 2009 3 comments

If you’re like me, which you either are or are aspiring to be, then you hate having to manually resize dozens of images. Ubuntu, and Linux Mint, by extension, offers a great image resizing and rotation tool for Nautilus. This tool allows you to resize a batch of images very quickly and easily: you select the images, right-click, and select “Resize images”. You can select how you want to scale the images (the options presented are a preset ratio, a percentage of the original dimensions, or a custom size) and how you want them to be saved (you can append each copy with something like “RESIZED” or choose to simply replace the original image).

This tool is particularly handy if you’re looking to post some of your images online – having it around makes it much simpler and easier to resize several hundred images from, say, a vacation. Smaller images mean faster transfer times, and to some degree less concern about other people pilfering your high-resolution images (this is aimed more at a few social networking websites that like to claim ownership over their users’ photos).

Distribution Upgrades

November 1st, 2009 No comments

As with the release of Karmic Koala, the majority of the other distributions we here at The Linux Experiment have decided to run will also be getting an upgrade. Here is a quick breakdown of what’s to come (in chronological order) to give you a heads up of what you can expect us to be blogging about shortly.

Gentoo – Release Set For: Tonight

OK fine, so technically Gentoo isn’t getting a “major new release” or anything like that but considering the nature of the distribution one could claim that it’s nightly builds are basically the same thing.

openSUSE 11.2 – Release Set For: November 12, 2009

The next step forward for openSUSE is version 11.2. Included in this release of openSUSE are major changes to YaST and zypper as well as a new release strategy whereby all releases are bootable by USB and CD-ROM. Some other incremental improvements in software are:

  • GNOME 2.28/KDE 4.3
  • Firefox 3.5
  • 3.1
  • Ext4 is the new default filesystem
  • Support for whole-disk encryption

Fedora 12 “Constantine” – Release Set For: November 17, 2009

Always the cutting edge distribution, Fedora has a massive list of changes for it’s next release. For starters all software packages have been recompiled for i686 which should allow for improved performance, especially on the Intel Atom processor. In addition, all software packages are now compressed with LZMA instead of GZIP which, along with yum presto integration (delta versus full downloads), should offer much faster downloads. Thanks to the newest version of Xorg, spanning desktops (1 desktop on 2+ monitors) is now possible. Other software improvements include:

  • GNOME 2.28/KDE 4.3
  • Firefox 3.5.2
  • PHP 5.3.0
  • Ogg Theora has been updated to the most recent version
  • GRUB now supports Ext4
  • Dynamically rotating wallpapers is now a feature under GNOME
  • NetworkManager has been enhanced to take advantage of Mobile Broadband technologies
  • Bluetooth services are now on-demand meaning they only use system resources when necessary
  • Tons of PulseAudio improvements
  • PackageKit has been improved and can now install software from more places (i.e. right within the web browser)

Linux Mint 8 “Helena” – Release Set For: November 2009

Linux Mint 8 continues the trend by incorporating all of the most recent Ubuntu improvements found in Karmic Koala as well as improving on the Mint specific programs. Specifically Mint improves the boot sequence as well as the Mint tools suite of applications that differentiate this distribution from Ubuntu. The end result should make for one of the most user friendly Linux distributions ever.

Debian 6.0 “Squeeze” – Release Set For: TBD 2010

If you are familiar with Debian’s release cycle then you know that what will become of “Squeeze” is simply what passes muster in the current testing repository. Although this distribution is still quite a ways off, it is promising quite a few interesting improvements including better architecture support and boot performance thanks to parallel processing. kFreeBSD is also now included which makes this the first officially supported non-Linux architecture for a Debian release. While many obsolete libraries are being removed for security reasons many new libraries are also making their first appearance including full IPv6 support. Finally there is preparation going into the packaging formats which will allow for future improvements, including better compression algorithms for smaller download sizes.

It’s going to be a busy month!

Check back soon as we begin our upgrades and blog about our experiences doing so.

I am currently running a variety of distributions, primarily Linux Mint 17.
Previously I was running KDE 4.3.3 on top of Fedora 11 (for the first experiment) and KDE 4.6.5 on top of Gentoo (for the second experiment).