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Applying updates to Docker and the Plex container

December 7th, 2014 No comments

In my last post, I discussed several Docker containers that I’m using for my home media streaming solution. Since then, Plex Media Server has updated to 0.9.11.4 for non-Plex Pass users, and there’s another update if you happen to pay for a subscription. As the Docker container I used (timhaak/plex) was version 0.9.11.1 at the time, I figured I’d take the opportunity to describe how to

  • update Docker itself to the latest version
  • run a shell inside the container as another process, to review configuration and run commands directly
  • update Plex to the latest version, and describe how not to do this
  • perform leet hax: commit the container to your local system, manually update the package, and re-commit and run Plex

Updating Docker

I alluded to the latest version of Docker having features that make it easier to troubleshoot inside containers. Switching to the latest version was pretty simple: following the instructions to add the Docker repository to my system, then running

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get install lxc-docker

upgraded Docker to version 1.3.1 without any trouble or need to manually uninstall the previous Ubuntu package.

Run a shell using docker exec

Let’s take a look inside the plex container. Using the following command will start a bash process so that we can review the filesystem on the container:

docker exec -t -i plex /bin/bash

You will be dropped into a root prompt inside the plex container. Check out the filesystem: there will be a /config and a /data directory pointing to “real” filesystem locations. You can also use ps aux to review the running processes, or even netstat -anp to see active connections and their associated programs. To exit the shell, use Ctrl+C – but the container will still be running when you use docker ps -a from the host system.

Updating Plex in-place: My failed attempt

Different Docker containers will have different methods of performing software updates. In this case, looking at the Dockerfile for timhaak/plex, we see that a separate repository was added for the Plex package – so we should be able to confirm that the latest version is available. This also means that if you destroy your existing container, pull the latest image, then launch a new copy, the latest version of Plex will be installed (generally good practice.)

But wait – the upstream repository at http://shell.ninthgate.se/packages/debian/pool/main/p/plexmediaserver/ does contain the latest .deb packages for Plex, so can’t we just run an apt-get update && apt-get upgrade?

Well, not exactly. If you do this, the initial process used to run Plex Media Server inside the Docker container (start.sh) gets terminated, and Docker takes down the entire plex container when the initial process terminates. Worse, if you then decide to re-launch things with docker start plex, the new version is incompletely installed (dpkg partial configuration).

So the moral of the story: if you’re trying this at home, the easiest way to upgrade is to recreate your Plex container with the following commands:

docker stop plex

docker rm plex

# The 'pull' process may take a while - it depends on the original repository and any dependencies in the Dockerfile. In this case it has to pull the new version of Plex.
docker pull timhaak/plex

# Customize this command with your config and data directories.
docker run -d -h plex --name="plex" -v /etc/docker/plex:/config -v /mnt/nas:/data -p 32400:32400 timhaak/plex

Once the container is up and running, access http://yourserver:32400/web/ to confirm that Plex Media Server is running. You can check the version number by clicking the gear icon next to your server in the left navigation panel, then selecting Settings.

Hacking the container: commit it and manually update Plex from upstream

If you’re more interested in hacking the current setup, there’s a way to commit your existing Plex image, manually perform the upgrade, and restart the container.

First, make sure the plex container is running (docker start plex) and then commit the container to your local filesystem (replacing username with your preferred username):

docker commit plex username/plex:latest

Then we can stop the container, and start a new instance where bash is the first process:

docker stop plex

docker rm plex

# Replace username with the username you selected above.
docker run -t -i --name="plex" -h plex username/plex:latest /bin/bash

Once inside the new plex container, let’s grab the latest Plex Media Server package and force installation:

curl -O https://downloads.plex.tv/plex-media-server/0.9.11.4.739-a4e710f/plexmediaserver_0.9.11.4.739-a4e710f_amd64.deb

dpkg -i plexmediaserver_0.9.11.4.739-a4e710f_amd64.deb

# When prompted, select Y to install the package maintainer's versions of files. In my instance, this updated the init script as well as the upstream repository.

Now, we can re-commit the image with the new Plex package. Hit Ctrl+D to exit the bash process, then run:

docker commit plex username/plex:latest

docker rm plex

# Customize this command with your config and data directories.
docker run -d -h plex --name="plex" -v /etc/docker/plex:/config -v /mnt/nas:/data -p 32400:32400 username/plex /start.sh

# Commit the image again so it will run start.sh if ever relaunched:
docker commit plex username/plex:latest

You’ll also need to adjust your /etc/init/plex.conf upstart script to point to username/plex.

The downside of this method is now that you’ve forked the original Plex image locally and will have to do this again for updates. But hey, wasn’t playing around with Docker interesting?




I am currently running Ubuntu 14.04 LTS for a home server, with a mix of Windows, OS X and Linux clients for both work and personal use.
I prefer Ubuntu LTS releases without Unity - XFCE is much more my style of desktop interface.
Check out my profile for more information.
Categories: Docker, Jake B, Plex, Ubuntu Tags:

Running a containerized media server with Ubuntu 14.04, Docker, and Plex

November 23rd, 2014 No comments

I recently took it upon myself to rebuild a general-purpose home server – installing a new Intel 530 240GB solid-state drive to replace a “spinning rust” drive, and installing a fresh copy of Ubuntu 14.04 now that 14.04.1 has released and there is much less complaining online.

The “new hotness” that I’d like to discuss has been the use of Docker to containerize various processes. Docker gets a lot of press these days, but the way I see it is a way to ensure that your special snowflake applications and services don’t get the opportunity to conflict with one another. In my setup, I have four containers running:

I like the following things about Docker:

  • Since it’s new, there are a lot of repositories and configuration instructions online for reference.
  • I can make sure that applications like Sonarr/NZBDrone get the right version of Mono that won’t conflict with my base system.
  • As a network administrator, I can ensure that only the necessary ports for a service get forwarded outside the container.
  • If an application state gets messed up, it won’t impact the rest of the system as much – I can destroy and recreate the individual container by itself.

There are some drawbacks though:

  • Because a lot of the images and Dockerfiles out there are community-based, there are some that don’t follow best practices or fall out of an update cycle.
  • Software updates can become trickier if the application is unable to upgrade itself in-place; you may have to pull a new Dockerfile and hope that your existing configuration works with a new image.
  • From a security standpoint, it’s best to verify exactly what an image or Dockerfile does before running it – for example, that it pulls content from official repositories (the docker-plex configuration is guilty of using a third-party repo, for example.)

To get started, on Ubuntu 14.04 you can install a stable version of Docker following these instructions, although the latest version has some additional features like docker exec that make “getting inside” containers to troubleshoot much easier. I was able to get all these containers running properly with the current stable version (1.0.1~dfsg1-0ubuntu1~ubuntu0.14.04.1). Once Docker is installed, you can grab each of the containers above with a combination of docker search and docker pull, then list the downloaded containers with docker images.

There are some quirks to remember. On the first run, you’ll need to docker run most of these containers and provide a hostname, box name, ports to forward and shared directories (known as volumes). On all subsequent runs, you can just use docker start $container_name – but I’ll describe a cheap and easy way of turning that command into an upstart service later. I generally save the start commands as shell scripts in /usr/local/bin/docker-start/*.sh so that I can reference them or adjust them later. The start commands I’ve used look like:

Plex
docker run -d -h plex --name="plex" -v /etc/docker/plex:/config -v /mnt/nas:/data -p 32400:32400 timhaak/plex
SABnzbd+
docker run -d -h sabnzbd --name="sabnzbd" -v /etc/docker/sabnzbd:/config -v /mnt/nas:/data -p 8080:8080 -p 9090:9090 timhaak/sabnzbd
Sonarr
docker run -d -h sonarr --name="sonarr" -v /etc/docker/sonarr:/config -v /mnt/nas:/data -p 8989:8989 tuxeh/sonarr
CouchPotato
docker run -d -h couchpotato --name="couchpotato" -e EDGE=1 -v /etc/docker/couchpotato:/config -v /mnt/nas:/data -v /etc/localtime:/etc/localtime:ro -p 5050:5050 needo/couchpotato
These applications have a “/config” and a “/data” shared volume defined. /data points to “/mnt/nas”, which is a CIFS share to a network attached storage appliance mounted on the host. /config points to a directory structure I created for each application on the host in /etc/docker/$container_name. I generally apply “chmod 777″ permissions to each configuration directory until I find out what user ID the container is writing as, then lock it down from there.

For each initial start command, I choose to run the service as a daemon with -d. I also set a hostname with the “-h” parameter, as well as a friendly container name with “–name”; otherwise Docker likes to reference containers with wild adjectives combined with scientists, like “drunk_heisenberg”.

Each of these containers generally has a set of instructions to get up and running, whether it be on Github, the developer’s own site or the Docker Hub. Some, like SABnzbd+, just require that you go to http://yourserverip:8080/ and complete the setup wizard. Plex required an additional set of configuration steps described at the original repository:

  • Once Plex starts up on port 32400, access http://yourserverip:32400/web/ and confirm that the interface loads.
  • Switch back to your host machine, and find the place where the /config directory was mounted (in the example above, it’s /etc/docker/plex). Enter the Library/Application Support/Plex Media Server directory and edit the Preferences.xml file. In the <Preferences> tag, add the following attribute: allowedNetworks=”192.168.1.0/255.255.255.0″ where the IP address range matches that of your home network. In my case, the entire file looked like:

    <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
    <Preferences MachineIdentifier="(guid)" ProcessedMachineIdentifier="(another_guid)" allowedNetworks="192.168.1.0/255.255.255.0" />

  • Run docker stop plex && docker start plex to restart the container, then load http://yourserverip:32400/web/ again. You should be prompted to accept the EULA and can now add library locations to the server.

Sonarr needed to be updated (from the NZBDrone branding) as well. From the GitHub README, you can enable in-container upgrades:

[C]onfigure Sonarr to use the update script in /etc/service/sonarr/update.sh. This is configured under Settings > (show advanced) > General > Updates > change Mechanism to Script.

To automatically ensure these containers start on reboot, you can either use restart policies (Docker 1.2+) or write an upstart script to start and stop the appropriate container. I’ve modified the example from the Docker website slightly to stop the container as well:

description "SABnzbd Docker container"
author "Jake"
start on filesystem and started docker
stop on runlevel [!2345]
respawn
script
/usr/bin/docker start -a sabnzbd
end script
pre-stop exec /usr/bin/docker stop sabnzbd

Copy this script to /etc/init/sabnzbd.conf; you can then copy it to plex, couchpotato, and sonarr.conf and change the name of the container and title in each. You can then test it by rebooting your system and running “docker ps -a” to ensure that all containers come up cleanly, or running “docker stop $container; service $container start”. If you run into trouble, the upstart logs are in /var/log/upstart/$container_name.conf.

Hopefully this introduction to a media server with Docker containers was thought-provoking; I hope to have further updates down the line for other applications, best practices and how this setup continues to operate in its lifetime.




I am currently running Ubuntu 14.04 LTS for a home server, with a mix of Windows, OS X and Linux clients for both work and personal use.
I prefer Ubuntu LTS releases without Unity - XFCE is much more my style of desktop interface.
Check out my profile for more information.
Categories: Docker, Jake B, Plex, Ubuntu Tags:

Initial thoughts about PC-BSD

January 16th, 2014 No comments

[Please note: this is a historical post – I’m no longer running *BSD in 2014, and this is a collection of thoughts on its setup in case I decide to return to the operating system. Further posts from me will focus on other Linux experiences.]

So after not too much effort, I’ve gotten PC-BSD to replace my FreeBSD installation and am back up and running. Some minor tips, interesting facts and tweaks:

  • Default filesystem and mountpoints all seem to be ZFS, which would make PC-BSD probably the quickest and easiest way to get a functional desktop environment running with this neat filesystem.
  • To enable Flash playback in Chromium (and I assume Firefox), run
    flashpluginctl on

    from the terminal (under your own user account, not root) and restart the browser. Thanks to the PC-BSD forums for this answer.

  • Enabling SSH server: add sshd_enable=”YES” to /etc/rc.conf, then /etc/rc.d/sshd start. You’ll also need to allow TCP port 22 inbound through the firewall in the PC-BSD Control Panel/Networking/Firewall Manager application.
  • Sound worked out of the box without any driver finagling, and is a much more simplistic setup:

 

From the PC-BSD Control Panel, a very simple way to select the default sound device.

From the PC-BSD Control Panel, a very simple way to select the default sound device.

I’m assuming the situation would have been better than the Kubuntu trials and tribulations with PulseAudio – all the possible nVidia HDMI output ports are listed in this dropdown list, as well as my onboard sound and USB/stereo audio adapter. In Phonon, the list is much simpler:

No greyed-out cards or shenanigans - Phonon just shows the default sound card from PC-BSD.

No greyed-out cards or “missing sink”s – Phonon just shows the default sound card from PC-BSD.

 

So far this has been a pretty great introductory experience – the desktop is polished, KDE integration appears to work well, and manual configuration has been limited to what I’d consider more advanced functionality like the SSH daemon.




I am currently running Ubuntu 14.04 LTS for a home server, with a mix of Windows, OS X and Linux clients for both work and personal use.
I prefer Ubuntu LTS releases without Unity - XFCE is much more my style of desktop interface.
Check out my profile for more information.
Categories: Flash, Jake B, PC-BSD Tags: , ,

My Initial Thoughts/Experiences with ArchLinux

July 29th, 2013 2 comments

Hello again everyone! By this point, I have successfully installed ArchLinux, as well as KDE, and various other everyday applications necessary for my desktop.

Aside from the issues with the bootloader I experienced, the installation was relatively straight forward. Since I have never used ArchLinux before, I decided to follow the Beginner’s Guide in order to make sure I wasn’t screwing anything up. The really nice thing about this guide is that it only gives you the information that you need to get up and running. From here, you can add any packages you want, and do any necessary customization.

Overall, the install was fairly uneventful. I also managed to install KDE, Firefox, Flash, and Netflix (more below) without any issues.

Some time ago, there was a package created for Ubuntu that allows you to watch Netflix on Linux. Since then, someone has created a package for ArchLinux called netflix-desktop. What this does, is creates an instance of Firefox in WINE that runs Silverlight so that the Netflix video can be loaded. The only issue that I’m running into with this package is that when I full-screen the Netflix video, my taskbar in KDE still appears. For the time being, I’ve just set the taskbar to allow windows to go over top. If anyone has any suggestions on how to resolve this, please let me know.

netflix

This isn’t my screenshot. I found it on the interweb. I just wanted to give you a good idea of how netflix-desktop looked. I’d like to thank Richard in advance for the screenshot.

Back to a little more about ArchLinux specifically. I’ve really been enjoying their package management system. From my understanding so far, there are two main ways to obtain packages. The official repositories are backed by “pacman” which is the main package manager. Therefore, if you wanted to install kde, you would do “pacman -S kde”. This is similar to the package managers on other distributions such as apt-get. The Arch User Repository is a repository of build scripts created by ArchLinux users that allow you to compile and configure other packages not contained within the official repositories. The really neat thing about this is that it can also download and install and dependencies contained in the official repositories using pacman automatically.

As I go forward, I am also thinking of ways I can contribute to the ArchLinux community, but for now, I will continue to explore and experiment.


I am currently running ArchLinux (x86_64).
Check out my profile for more information.

Linux From Scratch: We Have Lift-off…

November 4th, 2011 No comments

Hi Everyone,

Now that I have a relatively stable environment, I just wanted to write an update of how things went, and some issues that I ran into while installing my desktop environment.

No Sound

Not that I was expecting anything different from LFS, but I had no sound upon booting into KDE. I found this quite strange, as alsamixer was showing my sound card fine. One thing I can tell you, is that alsaconf is a filthy liar. My sound is now working, and it still says it can’t find my card. I’m not sure how I got it working, but here are a few tips.

  • Make sure your sound is un-muted in alsamixer.
  • Check your kernel to make sure that either support is compiled in for your card, or module support is selected.
  • If you selected module supprt, make sure the modules are loaded. For me, this was snd-hda-intel.

Firefox and Adobe Flash

I’m not going to go into too many details about Firefox, as Jake covered this in his post here, but I’d like to note that installing Flash into Firefox was quite easy. All I had to do was download the .tar.gz from Adobe, and do the following:

tar -xvf flash.tar.gz (or whatever the .tar.gz is called)
cd flash
cp libflashplayer.so ~/.mozilla/plugins (make sure plugins is created if it does not exist.)

KDE Crash On Logout

The first time I tried to logout of KDE, I noticed that it crashed. After doing some investigations, I found a solution here. You want to edit your $KDE4_PREFIX/share/config/kdm/kdmrc to reflect the following:

[X-:*-Core]

TerminateServer=true

What’s Next?

I’m actually not sure what I’m going to do next. I suppose I should get VLC running on the system, but that shouldn’t be too difficult. I now have a working web browser, flash, and sound, which should be fine until I can get other things working.


I am currently running ArchLinux (x86_64).
Check out my profile for more information.

On Veetle, Linux Mint, and ICEauthority

September 21st, 2011 4 comments

Like most people, I use my computer for multimedia. Recently I’ve discovered a multi-platform program called Veetle. It’s a pretty good program, but I ran into an issue after having installed it on my system (currently running Linux Mint 11): while I was using it to stream video, my computer basically locked up – every running process continued working, but I had no control over it. Since I was watching a full-screen video, this was pretty unfortunate. After all, it often helps to be able to maneuver your windows when you’re in a bind. I also immediately noticed that I lost all sound control on my keyboard. I rebooted my computer, but when I tried to log in, I got an error telling me that my computer could not update /home/user/.ICEauthority, followed by another error message, which I’m assuming was related but of less importance.

I actually into this exact problem before on an older machine, but before I had the chance to investigate, the hard disk died (for unrelated reasons). Luckily, I recognized the error on my newer machine and put two and two together: both failures coincided with the installation of Veetle. Now, because I’m a nerd, I have two functioning and constantly active computers right next to each other, for just such an occasion! It may also be related to the fact that websites that stream media tend to be a bit iffy so I feel more secure not using my Windows machine while exploring them, but enough about that! I Googled (or Binged, assuming “Bong” or “Bung” isn’t the past tense) a solution.

The solution

As it turns out, other people have run into this same problem, and it’s been covered on the Ubuntu forums and elsewhere. Basically, I ran the Veetle script as root (D’oh!), and this royally boned everything. This post by mjcritchie at the ubuntu Forums (which follows the advice of tommcd at LinuxQuestions.org) explained what to do:

I have had the same problem twice, both times after updating (currently running 64bit Karmic).

Tried various solutions on the net, but this is the only one that worked for me:

Open a terminal and run:

Quote:
sudo chown -R user:user /home/user/.*

Where user is your user_name. This should change ownership of all the hidden files and directories in your home directory to: user:user, as they should be.

This comes courtesy of tommcd over at this post on LinuxQuestions.org

So there you have it. My machine currently works, and now I can get back to streaming media. At least until the next time I get too adventurous when installing things.

Accessing Windows 7 Shares from Ubuntu is a Pain

June 28th, 2010 16 comments

This blog post is about my experiences. If you hit this page from a search engine looking to fix this issue click here to skip to the solution.

Recently, I’ve been reorganizing my computers based on their usage. My old HTPC, has resumed its duties as my primary desktop/server, my Mac Mini has been attached to the my desktop through Synergy, my server was given to my brother for personal use, and his old computer – a nettop – is now being used as our new HTPC.

After a painful decision making process – a topic for another time, and another post – I decided that this nettop, named Apollo after the Greek god of many things including “music, poetry, and the arts” [as close as I could get to entertainment],  should run Ubuntu 10.4 with XBMC as the media center app. After testing it’s media playback capabilities from a local file, I was rather impressed. I set out to add a SMB share from within XBMC, and was prompted to add a username and password.

I wasn’t really expecting this, because Leviathan – my desktop/sever running Windows 7 – has public sharing turned on, as well as a guest account. I entered in my credentials, and was asked yet again for a username and password. After trying multiple times, I decided to quit XBMC and see if I could get Ubuntu to connect to the share. Here too, I was prompted for a username and password, again and again.

Next I headed to the terminal to run smbclient. This didn’t work either, as I was shown a message saying smbclient failed with “SUCCESS – 0″. I guess success shouldn’t be zero, so my next move was to attempt mounting the network share using CIFS. Again, I was met with repeated defeat.

Begrudgingly I took to the internet with my problem, only to find that there were many people unable to connect to their Windows 7 from Ubuntu. The suggestions ranged from registry hacks to group policy administration, none of which worked. One repeated suggestion however, was to un-install the Windows Live Sign-in Assistant. However, as a user of the Windows Live Essentials (Wave 4) Beta that was recently released – I had no such program. I did however have a similar application called the Windows Live Messenger Companion, which I chose to uninstall – again, to no avail.

However, I soon reasoned that perhaps whatever was blocking people using the Windows Live Sign-in Assistant was now being used within the actual Windows Live Messenger client or the other Windows Live Essentials apps that I’d recently installed. I started by uninstalling everything but Windows Live Messenger – because I really, really like the beta version. Alas, this did not help. Next I uninstalled the actual Windows Live Messenger client and voila – I was able to connect with no prompting for passwords at all. Because that makes -any- sense.

As a matter of interest, I installed the regular WLM non-beta client and made sure that the Windows Live Sign-in Assistant was installed, and tried to connect again. Not surprisingly, I was no longer able to connect to my Windows 7 shares. After un-installing the Windows Live Sign-in Assistant my shares were back up and I was mostly happy. Except that I couldn’t use the new Windows Live Messenger beta.

I can’t be sure if the other tinkering I did also helped clear up my problems, but as a recap here are the steps I recommend to access your Windows 7 shares from Ubuntu:

1) If you have the Windows Live Essentials (Wave 4) beta installed, you’ll have to uninstall all of the applications that come with this. For now, you can install the current version of Windows Live Messenger and the other Windows Live Essentials.

2) If you have Windows Live Messenger installed, or ANY of the Windows Live Essentials programs installed check to see if you have the Windows Live Sign-in Assistant installed. If so, uninstall it.

3) Hopefully, now you can enjoy your Windows 7 shares in Ubuntu

Important Note:

Beta software has this nasty habit of leaving beta status sooner or later. If this issue is not resolved when the newest version of Windows Live Messenger is officially released, you may not be able to use the Window Live Messenger client if you need your Windows 7 shares from Ubuntu. I would suggest using an application like Pidgin as your instant messenger, as it can also connect to the Windows Live Messenger service. Other options include Digsby, Miranda, and Trillian.

Originally posted on my personal website here.

Adobe + Linux == Balls

May 27th, 2010 10 comments

This week, I replaced my increasingly infuriating Kubuntu installation with a fresh install of the beautiful Linux Mint 9 Isadora. Just like the project motto says, if Ubuntu is freedom, then Mint truly is elegance. The only hiccup that I hit during the entire installation process (aside from dicking up my fstab file because I suck) occurred when I tried to install Tweetdeck. As per usual, Adobe Air refused to correctly install on my system. It’s a damned good thing that Tweetdeck is an awesome app, because I’ve run into these problems before, and am just about ready to give up on it entirely.

This time, the alleged reason for my woes is that I dared to install Mint’s 64-bit build. Because, you know, we haven’t had 64-bit processors since 2003.

To make a long story short, it took me nearly an hour to get everything up and running. Below are two good resources that may help others in a similar situation:

In closing, Adobe sucks.




On my Laptop, I am running Linux Mint 12.
On my home media server, I am running Ubuntu 12.04
Check out my profile for more information.

Fix ATI vsync & video tearing issue once and for all!

May 6th, 2010 23 comments

NOTE: ATI’s most recent drivers now include a no tearing option in the driver control panel. Enabling it there is now the preferred method.

Two of the linux machines that I use both have ATI graphics cards from the 4xxx series in them. They work well enough for what I do, very casual gaming, lots of video watching, but one thing has always bothered me to no end: video tearing. I assumed that this was due to vsync being off by default (probably for performance sake) but even after installing the proprietary drivers in the new Ubuntu 10.04 and trying to force it on I still could not get the issue to resolve itself. After some long googling I found what seems to be a solution, at least in my case. I’ll walk you through what I did.

Before you continue read this: In order to fix this issue on my computers I had to trash xorg.conf and start over. If you are afraid you are going to ruin yourself, or if you have a custom setup already, please be very careful and read before doing what I suggest or don’t continue at all. Be sure to make a backup!

1 ) Install the ATI proprietary drivers and restart so that they can take effect.

2 ) Make a backup of your xorg.conf file. Do this by opening a terminal and copying it to a backup location. For example I ran the following code:

sudo cp /etc/X11/xorg.conf /etc/X11/backup.xorg.conf

3 ) Remove your existing (original) xorg.conf file:

sudo rm /etc/X11/xorg.conf

4 ) Generate a new default xorg.conf file using aticonfig (that’s two dashes below):

sudo aticonfig –initial

5 ) Enable video syncing (again two dashes before each command):

sudo aticonfig –sync-video=on –vs=on

6 ) If possible also enable full anti-aliasing:

sudo aticonfig –fsaa=on –fsaa-samples=4

7 ) Restart now so that your computer will load the new xorg.conf file.

8 ) Open up Catalyst Control Center and under 3D -> More Settings make sure the slider under Wait for vertical refresh is set to Always On.

That should be it. Please note that this trick may not work with all media players either (I noticed Totem seemed to still have some issues). One other thing I tried in VLC was to change the video output to be OpenGL which seemed to help a lot.

Good luck!




I am currently running a variety of distributions, primarily Linux Mint 17.
Previously I was running KDE 4.3.3 on top of Fedora 11 (for the first experiment) and KDE 4.6.5 on top of Gentoo (for the second experiment).
Check out my profile for more information.

Flash problems in Firefox

October 25th, 2009 5 comments

I mentioned in the podcast that I was having problems viewing Flash stuff in Firefox and I blamed it on KDE. I may have jumped the gun here, because the same issue started cropping up in GNOME. I went on the Linux Mint forums and other users were having similar issues. I’ve run the code that they suggested in the terminal, but I’m not sure if it worked because the problem doesn’t manifest instantly – sometimes it takes over half an hour before websites that run flash white themselves out.