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Posts Tagged ‘evolution’

Taking a look at some Linux e-mail clients

July 12th, 2015 No comments

Many people now use a browser based solution, like Gmail, for all of their e-mail needs however there are still plenty of reasons why someone might want to use a local e-mail client as well. In this post I’m going to take a look at some of the graphical e-mail client options available on Linux.

Balsa

I have to admin that I hadn’t even heard of Balsa before looking up e-mail clients to include in this list. In my limited time using it Balsa seems to be a relatively simple e-mail client that still offers quite a few options (supports POP3 and IMAP as well as PGP/GPG and even includes a spell checker) while still maintaining a very low memory footprint (less than 7MiB of RAM for an empty inbox). However one thing I couldn’t seem to get working was actually sending e-mail – it’s not that it was difficult to setup, I just simply couldn’t get it to connect to my SMTP server to send the mail. It kept timing out without giving me a cause which was annoying.

Balsa

Balsa

Balsa Project Website

Claws Mail

Similar to Balsa, Claws is also a very lightweight e-mail client that offers quite a few standard features but can also be expanded upon via plugins. Interestingly I couldn’t figure out a way to compose a non-plaintext (i.e. HTML) e-mail so perhaps the developers are of the opinion that e-mail should only be sent as text?

Claws Mail

Claws Mail

Claws Mail Project Website

Evolution

Evolution is/was (depends on who you ask) the golden standard for what an e-mail client on Linux should be. You can think of it as a complete Outlook replacement as it does so much more than just e-mail (contacts, calendar, memos, etc.) all without the need for additional plugins. This does come at a bit of a price as Evolution certainly feels heavier and uses more memory than some other e-mail only clients.

Evolution

Evolution

Evolution Project Website

Geary

Geary is a relative newcomer and has been getting quite a bit of attention as it is included as the default e-mail client in elementaryOS. This application is beautiful however very, very streamlined. You won’t find things like plugins, PGP/GPG, or loads of configuration options here, instead Geary focuses on being the best user experience it can be out of the box.

Geary

Geary

Geary Project Website

GNUMail.app

GNUMail.app is quite a bit different from the other e-mail clients on this list. It is associated with the GNUstep project and runs on both Linux and Mac OS X. Unfortunately while trying to use it on Linux I found myself at a loss… I simply couldn’t figure out how to use the thing! I managed to configure my account settings but could never get it to actually download any e-mail. So without actually being able to use the application I don’t have much else to say about it.

GNUMail.app

GNUMail.app

GNUMail.app Wikipedia Page

KMail

KMail provides the e-mail duties for the Kontact Personal Information Manager collection of software. It is a fully featured e-mail client and, because of the other Kontact applications, offers a compelling pseudo-integrated alternative to something heavy like Evolution. This is especially true if you are using the KDE desktop environment where things feel even more integrated.

KMail

KMail

KMail Project Website

Slypheed

Slypheed and Claws Mail are very similar, which makes sense because they used to be the same project (one was simply a place to try new features before putting it into the “real” project). Even though they share a linage Slypheed and Claws Mail now have different code bases and development teams. That said there aren’t very many obvious differences between the two at this point.

Slypheed

Slypheed

Slypheed Project Website

Thunderbird

Thunderbird is one of the most popular free/open source e-mail clients around and for good reason. It offers a good amount of features and can make use of plugins to add even more functionality. While it may not quite match up to Evolution in terms of advanced functionality for most people, myself included, it works very well.

Thunderbird

Thunderbird

Thunderbird Project Website




I am currently running a variety of distributions, primarily Linux Mint 18.
Previously I was running KDE 4.3.3 on top of Fedora 11 (for the first experiment) and KDE 4.6.5 on top of Gentoo (for the second experiment).

Finally Synching my Blackberry on Linux

January 2nd, 2010 18 comments

Some readers may recall all of the attempts that I’ve made in the past to synchronize my Blackberry with Mozilla’s Thunderbird email and calendar client. During each of these tries, I had relied on the OpenSync framework, along with the Barry project for communication with my phone, and a number of different solutions to link into Thunderbird. At various times, these included the opensync-plugin-iceowl, opensync-plugin-sunbird, and bluezync packages, none of which yielded success.

While running GNOME on my Debian laptop, I had managed to successfully synchronize my phone with the Evolution mail client. Even so, I continued to work at Thunderbird synchronization because I disliked Evolution, seeing it as a Microsoft Outlook clone, which is a platform that I have had considerable problems with in the past.

With my recent installation of Kubuntu 9.10 on my PC, I have been exposed to the Kontact PIM suite, and have thus far been impressed. Kmail is a solid email client, although the way that it handles the setup of multiple email accounts is confusing to say the least, forcing the user to create a sending, receiving, and identity object for each account, and then to link them together. Likewise, Kontact is a decent application, but is sorely lacking basic GUI configuration options, something I never thought that I would say about a KDE app. Finally, Kalendar does everything that one would expect, and allows the user to display appointments in a number of useful ways. All have excellent integration, and live in a tray widget that uses the native KDE notifications system to let me know when something important has happened.

Most importantly however, I managed to get the entire Kontact suite to sync with my Blackberry after about five minutes of playing around in the terminal. Unlike during previous installation attempts, I found the latest stable Barry packages available in my repositories, so installation was a snap. I simply added the following packages to my system:

  • libopensync0 v0.22-2
  • multisync-tools v0.92
  • libbarry0 v0.14-2.1
  • opensync-plugin-kdepim v0.22-4
  • opensync-plugin-barry v0.14-2.1

From a terminal, I then used the msynctool application and the following steps to do a little bit of configuration:

  1. msynctool –listplugins if the install went well, this command should list both kdepim-sync and barry-sync as available plugins
  2. msynctool –addgroup BB create an OpenSync sync profile for my Blackberry called BB
  3. msynctool –addmember BB barry-sync add the barry-sync plugin to the BB sync group
  4. msynctool –addmember BB kdepim-sync add the kdepim-sync plugin to the BB sync group
  5. msynctool –showgroup BB this lists each of the plugins that we just added to the BB sync group, along with their member numbers. In my case, barry-sync was member number 1, and kdepim-sync was member number 2. The output also showed that while barry-sync still needed to be configured, kdepim-sync had no configuration options to be set.
  6. msynctool –configure BB 1 configures member number 1 of the sync group BB. In my case, this was barry-sync, and simply popped a config file in the nano text editor. All that had to be changed in the file was the PIN of the Blackberry that the plugin would attempt to sync with.
  7. msynctool –sync BB actually performed the synchronization process. For safety’s sake, I made sure that Kontact was fully closed before running this command.

And that’s it! In the future, I simply have to run the msynctool –sync BB command to synchronize my Blackberry with Kontact. That’s one more reason to stick with Linux – Blackberry synchronization that isn’t tied to Microsoft Outlook!




On my Laptop, I am running Linux Mint 12.
On my home media server, I am running Ubuntu 12.04
Check out my profile for more information.

Barry: The Open-Sourced Blackberry Utility

September 30th, 2009 No comments

There is no denying that the installation process for the Barry project sucks. That said, the promise of having the ability to sync my blackberry with a linux-based calendar application like Mozilla’s Thunderbird or the Evolution mail client kept me working at it through the wee hours of the night. The Barry site at Sourceforge provides not one, not two, but four Debian packages (which rely on an additional two undocumented packages), that need to be downloaded and installed in a specific and undocumented order:

  1. libbarry0_0.15-0_i386.deb (sourceforge)
  2. barry-util_0.15-0_i386.deb (sourceforge)
  3. libglademm-2.4-1c2a (debian.org)
  4. barrybackup-gui_0.15-0_i386.deb (sourceforge)
  5. libopensync0 (debian.org)
  6. opensync-plugin-barry_0.15-0_i386.deb (sourceforge)

With the packages installed, I launched a terminal and used the auto-complete feature to find the command barrybackup. At first, I couldn’t figure out what it’s syntax was, until I realized that it doesn’t need any arguments, because it simply launches a GUI (that doesn’t appear anywhere in my Applications menu) that lets you back up your device databases:

Screenshot-Barry Backup

Well, thats a handy utility, assuming that it is also capable of restoring the backups to the device. I shied away from trying the restore feature, as I didn’t have access to a Windows box with which to fix the device should the worst happen.

I’m currently using Mozilla’s Thunderbird (re-branded in Debian as Icedove) as my primary mail client, along with the Lightning calendar plugin, and would be thrilled if I could synchronize it with my Blackberry. You’ll note that libopensync and a Barry opensync plugin were both a part of the installation process; having never used libopensync, I had a tough time figuring out how to make them cooperate.

The opensync page on Wikipedia lead me to install the multisync-tools package, which claims to be able to “synchronize calendars, address books and other PIM data between programs on your computer and other computers, mobile devices, PDAs or cell phones. It relies on the OpenSync  framework to do the actual synchronisation.” I have PIM data that I would like to sync! I have the OpenSync framework! We’re on a roll!

Finally, I installed the multisync-0.90 GUI and opensync-plugin-evolution v0.22-2 opensync plugin packages, which should have allowed me to sync between the Evolution mail client and my phone. I chose to try the process with this software first, as a plugin for Thunderbird was not immediately available. Unfortunately, when attempting to sync, I got this message:

Surprisingly, it was the evolution plugin that failed to connect

Surprisingly, it was the evolution plugin that failed to connect

Useful? Sort of. The Add button let me set up a Blackberry profile with both the barry and evolution plugins, but no matter how I tweaked the settings, I couldn’t get the evolution plugin to connect to my PIM data. Further, after making a synchronization group and adding plugins to it, I couldn’t find a way of replacing a plugin with a different one.

Sick of the limited GUI, I moved on to try KitchenSync, the KDE-based alternative. While it was uglier, I found it to be a far more useful front-end, and managed to get it to sync my device calendar and contacts with my filesystem:

Screenshot-PIM Synchronization - KitchenSync

This process exported all of the calendar and contact information from my Blackberry to a folder full of vCalendar and vContact files on my machine. Now if only I could get Thunderbird to read these files.

After a bit more looking around on the OpenSync webpage, I found a link to these guys, who claim to have programmed an opensync plugin called libopensync-plugin-mozilla-0.1.6 that allows Thunderbird and Lightning to talk to the OpenSync manager. They provide the plugin as a tarball that contains a *.so binary file and a sample *.xml configuration file… but no instructions on how to install them.

Thouroughly lost, I turned to the #opensync channel on freenode.net for help. Until they see fit to help me out, I’m taking a break from this. No sense in giving myself a heart attack out of extreme frustration.

Edit: I got some help from the members of the #opensync channel, who recommended that I drop the mozilla-sync.so file into the /usr/lib/opensync/plugins/ directory. While this didn’t immediately allow OpenSync to see the plugin, I noticed that every other plugin in the directory has an associated *.la configuration file. So I fabricated my own *.la file, and tried again. That didn’t work either.

The members of the channel then recommended that I try downloading the source code directly from the creators. I did as much, and found that it didn’t include a configure or make script, but just the source code. Not knowing how to proceed, I attempted to follow these instructions, which entailed downloading another 20 or so packages, including the sunbird-xpcom-devel package, which again lacks documentation on how to proceed with installation.

Lacking that package, and again frustrated beyond belief, I decided to drop the issue for another hour or so and do some math homework. That’s right, I chose to do math homework over playing with my computer, because this process has been that frustrating.

It doesn’t help that this entire process seems to be aimed at installed BlueZync, and not the opensync-mozilla-plugin. What the hell is going on here?