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Archive for October 5th, 2009

The Linux Experiment Podcast #1: The Pilot

October 5th, 2009 9 comments

Hosts: Dana H, Dave L, Jake B, Jon F, Phil D & Tyler B

Missing in action: Sasha D

Show length: 1:08:59

Description:

The first podcast from the guys at The Linux Experiment. It’s our pilot episode, so please bear with us on the length and the quality. We’re still learning how to use the Tux!

In this episode:

  • What our experiences have been like so far.
  • Dave L and Phil D compare experiences with openSUSE while Dana H and Tyler B contrast experiences with Fedora.
  • What the hell Linux? A segment where we vent some of our frustrations.
  • Shout out to mintCast

Music:

“Han Solo” by Superbus found on Free Music Archive here.

Get the show:

Listen here:

 

Mascot

October 5th, 2009 No comments

We decided that we should have a mascot for the site and for the experiment so we cooked one up this afternoon that we would like to share with you now! His name is Dr. Theodore L. Engelbart which we think makes him sound important. Truth be told we just wanted a name with initials that matched The Linux Experiment. We did our best…

Yes, he IS a penguin mad scientist dressed in a lab coat.

Yes, he IS a penguin mad scientist dressed in a lab coat

And just for fun we decided to include an ASCII art version, just for you. Click here to view that.

Technical details

  • Created in Linux
  • Created using KolourPaint initially
  • Finished up using GIMP

Ted’s going to be showing up in a few more places moving forward so be sure and keep an eye out for him ;)

TrueCrypt, kernel compilation and where’d /boot go?

October 5th, 2009 1 comment

Since I’ve installed Gentoo, I haven’t had access to my other drives. One of them is an NTFS-formatted WD Raptor, and the other is a generic Seagate 300GB drive that contains my documents, pictures and Communist propaganda inside a TrueCrypt partition. Getting the Raptor to work was fairly simple (as far as Gentoo goes) – I added the entry to my /etc/fstab file and then manually mounted the partition:

/dev/sdb1               /mnt/raptor     ntfs-3g         noatime         0 0

The TrueCrypt drive proved to be more of an issue. After installing the software and attempting to mount the partition, I encountered an error:

device-mapper: reload ioctl failed: Invalid argument 
Command failed

A quick Bing and the Gentoo Wiki described this problem exactly, with the caveat that I had to recompile my kernel to add support for LRW and XTS support. Into the kernel configuration I went – the only difference I noticed is that LRW and XTS are considered “EXPERIMENTAL” but aren’t noted as such on the requirements page:

Kernel configuration options

(This may come down to an x64 vs. x86 issue, but I haven’t run into any issues with these options enabled (yet!))

Of course, then came the make && make modules_install commands, which didn’t take too long to complete. The question then became, how do I install the new kernel? Looking in my /boot partition, I only had a few template files – and not the kernel itself or any grub settings. Essentially, /boot had nothing in it but the system still launches properly!

I then tried mounting /dev/sda1 manually, and the kernel and grub.conf showed up properly in the mountpoint. Something is obviously wrong with the way my system remounts /boot during the startup process, but at least now I’m able to install the new kernel. After copying /arch/x86_64/boot/bzImage to the newly available directory, I rebooted and the new kernel was picked up properly. TrueCrypt now lets me open, create and delete files from /media/truecrypt1, and automatically uses ntfs-3g support to accomplish this.

Overall, I’m pretty pleased at how easily I can recompile a kernel, and installation was seamless once I figured out that /boot wasn’t pointing to the right location. I expect I’ll try and manually remove the directory from /dev/sda3 and see if that makes a difference.




I am currently running various *BSD variants for this Experiment.
I currently run a mix of Windows, OS X and Linux systems for both work and personal use.
For Linux, I prefer Ubuntu LTS releases without Unity and still keep Windows 7 around for gaming.
Check out my profile for more information.

Blackbery Sync Attempt #3: Compiling from Source

October 5th, 2009 7 comments

After my first two attempts at getting my Blackberry to sync with Mozilla Thunderbird, I got pissed off and went right to the source of my problems. I emailed the developer of the opensync-plugin-mozilla package that (allegedly) allows Thunderbird to play nicely with OpenSync, and gave him the what for, (politely) asking what I should do. He suggested that I follow the updated installation instructions for checking out and compiling the latest version of his plugin from scratch instead of using the older, precompiled versions that are no longer supported.

I set to it, first removing all of the packages that I had installed during my last two attempts, excluding Barry, as I had already built and installed the latest version of its libraries. Everything else, including OpenSync and all of its plugins went, and I started from scratch. Luckily, the instructions were easy to follow, although they recommended that I get the latest versions of some libraries by adding Debian’s sid repositories to my sources list. This resulted in me shitting my pants later in the day, when I saw 642 available updates for my system in Synaptic. I figured out what was going on pretty quickly and disabled updates from sid, without ruining my system. If there’s one thing that Windows has taught me over the years, it is to never set a machine to auto-install updates.

Once I had the source code and dependency libraries, the install was a snap. The plugin source came with a utils directory full of easy to use scripts that automated most of the process. With everything going swimmingly, I was jarred out of my good mood by a nasty error that occurred when I ran the build-install-opensync.sh script:

CMake Error at cmake/modules/FindPkgConfig.cmake:357 (message):
None of the required ‘libopensync1;>=0.39′ found
Call Stack (most recent call first):
cmake/modules/FindOpenSync.cmake:27 (PKG_SEARCH_MODULE)
CMakeLists.txt:15 (FIND_PACKAGE)

CMake Error at cmake/modules/FindOpenSync.cmake:46 (MESSAGE):
OpenSync cmake modules not found.  Have you installed opensync core or did
you set your PKG_CONFIG_PATH if installing in a non system directory ?
Call Stack (most recent call first):
CMakeLists.txt:15 (FIND_PACKAGE)

It turns out that the plugin requires OpenSync v0.39 or greater to be installed to work. Of course, the latest version of same in either the Debian main or lenny-backports repositories is v0.22-2. This well-aged philosophy of the Debian Stable build has irked me a couple of times now, and I fully intend to update my system to the testing repositories before the end of the month. In any case, I quickly made my way over to the OpenSync homepage to obtain a newer build of their libraries. There I found out not only that version 0.39 had just been released on September 21st, and also that it isn’t all that stable:

Releases 0.22 (and 0.2x svn branch) and before are considered stable and suitable for production. 0.3x releases introduce major architecture and API changes and are targeted for developers and testers only and may not even compile or are likely to contain severe bugs.

0.3x releases are not recommended for end users or distribution packaging.

Throwing caution to the wind, I grabbed a tarball of compilation scripts from the website, and went about my merry way gentooing it up. After a couple of minor tweaks to the setEnvOpensync.sh script, I got the cmpOpensync script to run, which checked out the latest trunk from the svn, and automatically compiled and installed it for me. By running the command msynctool –version, I found out that I now had OpenSync v0.40-snapshot installed. Relieved, I headed back to my BlueZync installation. This time around, I managed to get right up to the build-install-bluezync.sh script before encountering another horrible dependency error:

– checking for one of the modules ‘glib-2.0′
–   found glib-2.0, version 2.16.6
– Found GLib2: glib-2.0 /usr/include/glib-2.0;/usr/lib/glib-2.0/include
– Looking for include files HAVE_GLIB_GREGEX_H
– Looking for include files HAVE_GLIB_GREGEX_H – found
– checking for one of the modules ‘libxml-2.0′
–   found libxml-2.0, version 2.6.32
– checking for one of the modules ‘libopensync1′
–   found libopensync1, version 0.40-snapshot
– checking for one of the modules ‘thunderbird-xpcom;icedove-xpcom’
–   found icedove-xpcom, version 2.0.0.22
–     THUNDERBIRD_XPCOM_VERSION 2.0.0.22
–     THUNDERBIRD_VERSION_MAIN 2
–     THUNDERBIRD_XPCOM_MAIN_INCLUDE_DIR /usr/include/icedove
–     NSPR_MAIN_INCLUDE_DIR /usr/include/nspr
–     THUNDERBIRD_XPCOM_LIBRARY_DIRS /usr/lib/icedove
–     THUNDERBIRD_XPCOM_LIBRARIES xpcom;plds4;plc4;nspr4;pthread;dl
– checking for one of the modules ‘sunbird-xpcom;iceowl-xpcom’
–   found iceowl-xpcom, version 0.8
SUNBIRD_INCLUDE_DIRS /usr/include/iceowl;/usr/include/iceowl/xpcom;/usr/include/iceowl/string;/usr/include/nspr
SEVERAL
–      SUNBIRD_MAIN_INCLUDE_DIR /usr/include/iceowl
–      SUNBIRD_VERSION 0.8
– Found xpcom (thunderbird and sunbird):
–   THUNDERBIRD_XPCOM_VERSION=[2.0.0.22]
–   SUNBIRD_VERSION=[0.8]
–   THUNDERBIRD_VERSION_MAIN=[2]
–   SUNBIRD_VERSION_MAIN=[0]
–   XPCOM_INCLUDE_DIRS /usr/include/nspr;/usr/include/icedove;/usr/include/icedove/addrbook;/usr/include/icedove/extensions;/usr/include/icedove/rdf;/usr/include/icedove/string;/usr/include/icedove/xpcom_obsolete;/usr/include/icedove/xpcom;/usr/include/icedove/xulapp;/usr/include/iceowl
–   XPCOM_LIBRARY_DIRS /usr/lib/icedove
–   XPCOM_LIBRARIES xpcom;plds4;plc4;nspr4;pthread;dl
–   SUNBIRD_VERSION 0.8
CALENDAR_VERSION=[8]
LIBTBXPCOM_INCLUDE_DIR
XPCOM_LIBRARIES  xpcom;plds4;plc4;nspr4;pthread;dl
ENABLE_TESTING [yes]
TESTING ENABLED
– checking for one of the modules ‘check’
CMake Error at cmake/modules/FindPkgConfig.cmake:357 (message):
None of the required ‘check’ found
Call Stack (most recent call first):
cmake/modules/FindCheck.cmake:27 (PKG_SEARCH_MODULE)
CMakeLists.txt:73 (FIND_PACKAGE)

CMAKING mozilla-sync 0.1.7
– Configuring done

From what I can gather from this output, the configuration file was checking for dependencies, and got hung up on one called “check.” Unfortunately, this gave me zero information that I could use to solve the problem. I can verify that the install failed by running msynctool –listplugins, which returns:

Available plugins:
msynctool: symbol lookup error: msynctool: undefined symbol: osync_plugin_env_num_plugins

Ah, shit. Looks like I’m stuck again. Maybe one day I’ll figure it out. Until then, if any of our readers has ever seen something like this, I could use a couple of pointers.