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Archive for November, 2015

Listener Feedback podcast episode 48: Boom Boom Beckett – Boom Boom Baby

November 29th, 2015 No comments

Listener Feedback podcast is a royalty free and Creative Commons music podcast. This episode, titled “Episode 48: Full Album – Boom Boom Beckett – Boom Boom Baby” was released on Sunday November 29th, 2015. To suggest artists and albums that should be featured you can send an e-mail to contact@listenerfeedback.net or message @LFpodcast on Twitter.

To subscribe to the podcast add the feed here or listen to this episode by clicking here.

Categories: Podcast, Tyler B Tags:

Linux alternatives: Mp3tag → puddletag

November 28th, 2015 No comments

Way back when I first made my full-time switch to Linux I made a post about an alternative to the excellent Mp3tag software on Windows. At the time I suggested a program called EasyTAG and while that is still a good program I’ve recently come across one that I think I may actually like more: puddletag.

A screenshot of puddletag from their website

A screenshot of puddletag from their website

While it is very similar to EasyTAG I find puddletag’s layout a bit easier to navigate and use.

This post originally appeared on my personal website here.

Big distributions, little RAM 9

November 28th, 2015 2 comments

It’s been a while but once again here is the latest instalment of the series of posts where I install the major, full desktop, distributions into a limited hardware machine and report on how they perform. Once again, and like before, I’ve decided to re-run my previous tests this time using the following distributions:

  • Debian 8.2 (Cinnamon)
  • Debian 8.2 (GNOME)
  • Debian 8.2 (KDE)
  • Debian 8.2 (MATE)
  • Debian 8.2 (Xfce)
  • Elementary OS 0.3.1 (Freya)
  • Kubuntu 15.10 (KDE)
  • Linux Mint 17.2 (Cinnamon)
  • Linux Mint 17.2 (MATE)
  • Linux Mint 17.2 (Xfce)
  • Mageia 5 (GNOME)
  • Mageia 5 (KDE)
  • Ubuntu 15.10 (Unity)
  • Xubuntu 15.10 (Xfce)

I also attempted to try and install Fedora 23, Linux Mint 17.2 (KDE) and OpenSUSE 42.1 but none of them were able to complete installation.

All of the tests were done within VirtualBox on ‘machines’ with the following specifications:

  • Total RAM: 512MB
  • Hard drive: 10GB
  • CPU type: x86 with PAE/NX
  • Graphics: 3D Acceleration enabled

The tests were all done using VirtualBox 5, and I did not install VirtualBox tools (although some distributions may have shipped with them). I also left the screen resolution at the default (whatever the distribution chose) and accepted the installation defaults. All tests were run prior to December 2015 so your results may not be identical.

Results

Just as before I have compiled a series of bar graphs to show you how each installation stacks up against one another. Measurements were taken using the free -m command for memory and the df -h command for disk usage.

Like before I have provided the results file as a download so you can see exactly what the numbers were or create your own custom comparisons (see below for link).

Things to know before looking at the graphs

First off if your distribution of choice didn’t appear in the list above its probably not reasonably possible to be installed (i.e. I don’t have hours to compile Gentoo) or I didn’t feel it was mainstream enough (pretty much anything with LXDE). As always feel free to run your own tests and link them in the comments for everyone to see.

Quick Info

  • Out of the Cinnamon desktops tested Debian 8.2 had the lowest memory footprint
  • Out of the GNOME desktops tested Mageia 5 had the lowest memory footprint
  • Out of the KDE desktops tested Mageia 5 had the lowest memory footprint
  • Out of the Xfce desktops tested Debian 8.2 had the lowest memory footprint
  • Out of the MATE desktops tested Debian 8.2 had the lowest memory footprint
  • Elementary OS 0.3.1 had the highest memory footprint of those tested
  • Debian 8.2 Xfce and MATE tied for the lowest memory footprint of those tested
  • Debian 8.2 Xfce had the lowest install size of those tested
  • Kubuntu 15.10 had the largest install size of those tested
  • Elementary OS 0.3.1 had the lowest change after updates (+2MiB)
  • Mageia 5 KDE had the largest change after updates (-265MiB)

First boot memory (RAM) usage

This test was measured on the first startup after finishing a fresh install.

big_distro_little_ram_9_first_boot_memory_usageMemory (RAM) usage after updates

This test was performed after all updates were installed and a reboot was performed.

big_distro_little_ram_9_memory_usage_after_updatesMemory (RAM) usage change after updates

The net growth or decline in RAM usage after applying all of the updates.

big_distro_little_ram_9_memory_usage_change_after_updatesInstall size after updates

The hard drive space used by the distribution after applying all of the updates.

big_distro_little_ram_9_install_sizeConclusion

Once again I will leave the conclusions to you. Source data provided below.

Source Data

Distro hopping: feeling good with my time on LXLE

November 23rd, 2015 No comments

Well the time has come to officially switch off from LXLE. This time around however I find myself in a weird spot. I’ve honestly struggled with LXLE; not in using the distribution itself but rather coming up with things to write about it. That isn’t to say that LXLE is bad by any stretch of the imagination, in fact it is quite good, it’s just that once you get used to the light weight desktop environment (DE) there is a perfectly capable “heavy weight” distribution underneath. What I mean by this is that once you get used to the DE and it fades into the background you’re left with a perfectly functional distribution that could just as easily have been Ubuntu or Linux Mint or Fedora or {insert your favourite one here}.

Due to this strength I didn’t find myself struggling to make things work or figure out new ways to accomplish the things I needed to do… things were pretty much where I expected them to be… and that’s a great thing! It means that if you want to run a distribution that will be somewhat lighter on your system but you don’t want to scrimp on the applications you need to get work done then LXLE may just be for you.

The desktop

The desktop

Pros:

  • One of the few distributions that uses the light weight LXDE environment
  • Very low system resources (my machine took less than 400MiB of RAM after logging into the desktop!)
  • Just because it is a light weight distribution doesn’t mean it gives you less featured alternative applications
  • Boring… but in a good way! The distribution gets out of your way and lets you get work done!

Cons:

  • Still a couple of little bugs that seem like obvious things that would be caught if it had a larger user base
  • Ships with a load of applications, the majority of which most people probably won’t use day-to-day (maybe they could save some space instead?)
  • Boring… other than the desktop environment there isn’t anything overly unique to this distribution. Seems like you could just install LXDE on top of Ubuntu and get the same thing.

Other:

  • How awesome is the desktop background changer button right in the tool bar? I mean at first I thought it was a ridiculous waste of space but now I’m addicted to changing my desktop wallpaper with the push of a button.

Be sure to check back here soon to find out where I land next!

This post is part of a series:

Categories: LXLE, Tyler B Tags: ,

Distro hopping: adding a podcast in Guayadeque on LXLE

November 15th, 2015 No comments

I have to admit that I hadn’t even heard of Guayadeque until starting this little distro hopping adventure but since then I’ve found it to be the default music player in more than one distribution. As such I’ve decided to try and use it to see if it will work better for me instead of the usual alternatives.

Seeing as I’m a big fan of podcasts I’ve decided to see how Guayadeque handles the process of adding and listening to my feeds.

Start Guayadeque and click the Podcasts tab

Step 1

Step 1

Right click under the Channels column and click New Channel

You can add feeds directly from the podcast directory or from feed URLs

You can add feeds directly from the podcast directory or from feed URLs

If for some reason you can’t find your podcast in their existing directory you can simply find the podcast RSS feed and plug it into the Url text box instead.

For example let’s say I wanted to add the feed for Listener Feedback podcast. Unfortunately it isn’t already listed in the built-in directory but there are a few handy feeds that I found on the website here (there is even an Ogg Vorbis feed for higher quality). Once pasted in Guayadeque was able to find the podcast details right away:

Some handy settings are available

Some handy settings are available

Download and play

A short download later and the podcast is ready to be played!

Playing away

Playing away

So all told it’s a relatively painless to add a podcast to Guayadeque. My one issues with the user interface are that it feels a bit dated and seems to require a lot of right-clicking and context menus which may not be immediately obvious for some users. That said they’re very minor complaints and it is still a very functional application.

This post is part of a series:

Listener Feedback podcast episode 47: LukHash – The Other Side

November 14th, 2015 No comments

Listener Feedback podcast is a royalty free and Creative Commons music podcast. This episode, titled “Episode 47: Full Album – LukHash – The Other Side” was released on Saturday November 14th, 2015. To suggest artists and albums that should be featured you can send an e-mail to contact@listenerfeedback.net or message @LFpodcast on Twitter.

To subscribe to the podcast add the feed here or listen to this episode by clicking here.

Distro hopping: slimming down with LXLE

November 8th, 2015 1 comment

Now that my time with BSD has come to an end I thought I should jump back into Linux via a distribution I had never even heard of before (just to keep things interesting!). DistroWatch is an excellent source for finding different, unique and of course obscure distributions but I was surprised to find one in the top 10 that I had never even heard of before: LXLE.

LXLE on the DistroWatch top 10

LXLE on the DistroWatch top 10

So what exactly is LXLE? Well according to their website:

LXLE is based on Lubuntu which is an Ubuntu OS using the LXDE desktop environment. It is designed to be a drop-in and go OS, primarily for aging computers. Its intention is to be able to install it on any computer and be relatively done after install. At times removing unwanted programs or features is easier than configuring for a day. Our distro follows the same LTS schedule as Ubuntu. In short, LXLE is an eclectic respin of Lubuntu with its own user support.

After a quick install I am now running on LXLE!

The desktop

The desktop

Let’s take a quick walk through of what comes with this light weight distribution.

To browse your files it comes with the slim PCManFM:

PCManFM

PCManFM

Unfortunately it is also where I ran into my first issue with the distribution. The default user name in the installer was “qwerty” but somehow this survived, even though I replaced it with my own name, in the quick Places links along the left-hand side of the window. They still pointed to non-existent locations based on this default user name.

That's... not right...

That’s… not right…

Seamonkey suite is used for most basic Internet functionality including web browsing, e-mail, FTP, IRC, etc.

Seamonkey

Seamonkey web browser

Other interesting inclusions are anti-virus scanner ClamTk, password manager KeePassX, open source BitTorrent Sync alternative Syncthing, instant messenger Pidgin, Tox client uTox, music editor Audacity, music player Guayadeque, a load of games and many, many more utilities.

ClamTk, for all your virus scanning needs

ClamTk, for all your virus scanning needs

For a distribution that prides itself on being light weight it sure does ship with a lot of software! Like the others I’ll be playing around with LXLE over the next couple of days and post my thoughts and experiences here.

This post is part of a series:

Categories: LXLE, Tyler B Tags: ,

KWLUG: Sound in Linux (2015-11)

November 5th, 2015 No comments

This is a podcast presentation from the Kitchener Waterloo Linux Users Group on the topic of Sound in Linux published on November 5th 2015. You can find the original Kitchener Waterloo Linux Users Group post here.

Read more…

Categories: Linux, Podcast, Tyler B Tags: , ,